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on 16 March 2017
Having spent some time away from work for a couple of years, I wanted to read up on any new ideas. To be honest, there aren't that many and I read the book in an evening. That said, having had a number of years experience of working in organisations, I can say this book does provide highly accurate observations of office life and those who work in them, so if you're new to the world of office work this book will be very useful.

What I did find though was that although the book had a lot of good ideas about what to do it seemed a bit thin on how you should do them. For example, just how do you "keep your ear to the ground" if you've not done this before or doesn't come easy to you? It tells you to watch out for hidden agendas but if you've no experience of that, this book won't tell you how. There's also some contradictory advice: first it suggests you should work half the day and spend the other half finding out about the organisation, people and cultivating relationships, but later in the book it suggests you need to be prepared to burn the midnight oil to help get ahead.

That said, it *does* tell you the rules of work, some obvious and some less so, and overall it is, as I've said, highly accurate. Each rule is about a page or two long and it cuts to the chase, no fluff, no filler, just straightforward, clear explanations. It's a great introduction and will help you identify what you need to know more about. Well worth a read.
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on 8 February 2017
Some of the points are basic but really helps to organise the basics into steps and focus
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on 14 June 2017
Good Read . I Would take quite a few suggestions on board
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on 5 November 2014
Was a gift for a friend again brilliant just like all the other rules books
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on 5 December 2013
Well written and not a problem to follow and understand. Highly recommended.
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on 6 July 2017
Excellent Book
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on 2 June 2017
Great price and very prompt delivery
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on 19 November 2017
It's ok

Few of the rules are interesting the rest are just simple or mediocre, probably to fill up more pages.

Seems like is a "book to make money", and that's it.

But is a good read if you buy the book from second hand.
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on 15 March 2013
Lots of reviews complain that Templar's books are all about stating the obvious and whilst this is probably true that doesn't, in my opinion, lessen the value of this book. I am a very successful person in my career and it has taken me many many years to learn some of the key lessons in this book, and even then I learnt loads from it.
I don't know what the critics expect to read when they pick up one of Templar's books but for me this one didn't fail to deliver. I usually gift my books to charity once read but something tells me I'm going to want to hold onto this one.......
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on 2 April 2010
For someone starting out on their career, wishing to move up the corporate ladder or seeking to clarify their attitude to work I recommend this book as a simple, but slightly flawed, overview of the typical office temperament and politics. The book contains 108 rules, all presented in a succinct, neat and very readable format. Some of the rules and Templar's anecdotes are quite interesting and/or funny, which, when combined with his friendly style, make this very readable.

How much you get out of this book will depend on your level of experience, desire for conformity in your working attitude and the type of job that you do. The rules primarily describe an ideal (in Templar's mind), ambitious (but affable), highly competent (but smarmy) white collar office worker or manager, although most are general enough to be applicable to other professions. They give (sometimes obvious) advice on how to: stand out from the crowd (for the right reasons), act up for promotion, deal with other people, present yourself, organize effectively, know your corporation etc.

The depth of advice, although comprehensive, is fairly basic, but is at the right level for a book of this type. Any more analytical and both readability and practicality would suffer. Some of the rules seemingly contradict and overlap, which Templar seems to just ignore. However these areas of ambiguity can be easily spotted and resolved as the reader sees fit.

Also, there is a slight underlying feeling of disingenuousness with some of the rules, especially with those that advocate being nice. Although sincerity does get a mention, it's only briefly and after a long paragraph detailing the material advantages of this attitude. There is a part titled "If you can't say anything nice - shut up" which, when combined with his references to other workers as "worker ants" and other derogatory terms equals smarminess in my mind.

Anyway, the above criticisms are a relatively small aspect of the whole, nearly all of the rules are sensible and affable; the reader can adjust what he doesn't like at his own discretion using his personal experience. Also, as a description of the reality of typical office life this book is pretty much spot on and following these rules will definitely help you to work the system. However it will only give you the "edge in everything you do, without having to compromise your principles" if your principles don't include not being smarmy.
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