Learn more Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Worried Blues Shop now Fitbit

Customer reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
25
4.3 out of 5 stars


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 24 January 2014
When a disheartened young woman seeks spiritual and religious assistance to void her (non) marriage to Mr Shore, she is met with nothing but a series of metaphorical brick walls. But faith always leads to hope, which leads to life, which leads to absolutely anything. So a few years down the track, when Lord Hastings graces the Shores' place of business with his presence, it is actually the Hand of Fate holding the door open for Hastings to step through to reward our heroine for her patience.

As things turn out, it appears that Hastings himself is in fact a metaphorical doorway to greater things and it soon becomes apparent that our Ms Shore is destined to lay with (*gasps*) the King of England. The first time they meet is an early comical highlight of the book as she threatens to kick him in the ghoulies if he "...dares to lay a hand on her... ". I had to stifle a giggle /guffaw at this, and at once I fell in love with the character of Lisbeth, as well as the book itself. The writing is light and the story so far is not is not trying to be a heavy handed history lesson. Prt one of this book is more of a romantic comedy set in medieval England.

Any who, the story begins to liven up and mature very quickly, just like the relationship between King Edward and his delectable mistress. A series of events transpire to test their mettle and the bonds linking the two souls begin to strengthen faster than they realise. War is looming with France and treachery lies everywhere for our favourite King and poor Lisbeth is making enemies faster than the poor girl can think. But her time spent with Ned makes her a happy soul and thanks to the lively and realistic writing style from Ms Martyn, we find that reading MISTRESS TO THE CROWN is an absolute pleasure.

Time passes. Goals are achieved. Families and friends are not what they seem, and enemies are made. Thus is the life of a woman destined to be mistress to the King of England.

Such is the price of love.

BFN Greggorio
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 19 August 2013
Isolde Martyn has a wonderful gift for not only writing a story that is rich with evocative historical detail but perfectly balance by plot and characters that make you want to keep reading. It is rare that I truly struggle to put a book down but with this one I was so immersed in the story and lives of Elizabeth 'Jane' Shore, Ned (King Edward IV), Hastings and even the King's conniving Step-son, Thomas Grey, I wanted nothing more than to just sit down and read from start to finish - well, maybe stopping for the occasional cup of tea!

You know a story is special when at the end you find yourself wishing there was just a little more, that you could spend a few more days with characters who feel like friends. Perhaps the dramatic parts of these character's lives are over, but wouldn't it be nice to just pop round and spend a few hours with them over dinner... which is exactly how I felt at the end of Mistress to the Crown.

This is not the first book I've read by Isolde Martyn and I have enjoyed every one. If you've read her previous novels the decision to purchase this one will be easy but if you haven't then Mistress to the Crown is the perfect place to start. I loved it.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 18 April 2015
I liked the abundant sensory detail that puts you in the scene and the rich, believable characterizations, especially those of Elizabeth (Jane) Shore and Edward IV. The dialogue is well done; the author doesn’t go overboard in trying to make it sound “medieval,” but it’s strong and lively and has the right flavor, in my opinion. I also thought the sex scenes were less cringe-worthy than most.

I have long thought that Elizabeth Shore ended up being called Jane exactly as it happens in this book – King Edward, who has a wife, a daughter, a sister, and at least one mistress called Elizabeth – decides it won’t do and gives Mistress Shore the nickname Jane. (Edward’s introducing the topic by asking “Listen, wench, are you always called Elizabeth?” is an example of the natural-sounding, yet flavorful use of language.)

By contrast, in the same genre and with some of the same characters, Philippa Gregory’s “White Queen” is thin gruel, lacking sensory detail and character development.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 1 July 2013
It is a well researched, historically accurate, witty, romance. An excellent read about a interesting woman who played an important part in the events of the period.
Elizabeth Lambard (Jane Shore) was one of Englands most famous Royal Mistresses. but she was far more than that. I have recommeded this book (as indeed all the books written by Isolde Martyn) to my friends..
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 26 January 2014
This is a utterly brilliant book about Jane shore 's life as the kings mistress. I have read many books set in the tudor and medieval era and this book is definitely one of the best. As a historian I would notice if one of the facts in this book was wrong but remarkable as it is I found no mistakes. A great read and I enjoyed it very much.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 28 January 2014
I enjoyed some of this book but there were just too many characters. The bare historical facts were there but a lot was not explained so I ended up feeling confused at times. Nevertheless it does portray what it was like to live in London and the court during this period. The romance is there without too much smut.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 7 June 2014
I was a bit wary of this being a Mills and Boon. Thought it would be overly slushy and torrid but it wasn't at all. It is up there with the Phillipa Gregory's and other historical novels that I have read..... thoroughly enjoyed it.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 4 January 2017
I have read several novels dealing with story of Elizabeth/Jane Shore and this is one of the best. The scene setting is great, really evoking the times and the story shows how powerless women were in those days - it is no wonder that many turned to the option of becoming a mistress to a powerful man as it was one way of gaining a bit of security. Even then, when the king asks for you to become his leman, it would have been pretty difficult to refuse. Elizabeth/Jane is shown as a woman desperately trying to make her own way in a man's world and is a very sympathetic character. I really like the ending as well, which was, of course, based on real history.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 20 October 2013
Very much in the Style of Phillipa Gregory but as outstanding in her own right. Fabulous storyline, held you gripped to the seat. Will look out for more of the authors books.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 15 November 2013
Good read, similar to Phillipa Gregory but better I found. The story was very gripping and I couldn't put it down.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse


Need customer service? Click here