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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
61
4.4 out of 5 stars
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on 5 February 2016
Such a shame I can only ever give a 4 star for these books. I do love this series but they are just that bit too far fetched, and you always have to suspend a belief in real life. That said they are very readable and enjoyable.
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on 6 March 2017
as i wanted
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on 21 February 2015
A little to fast in places, to much detail in others, and the Latin could be better translated so you could understand more, but still a good read.
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on 12 April 2017
Bought for a freind
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on 24 April 2017
Have now read all the Templar series. Great entertainment.
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on 29 December 2012
I found it amusing that there were repetitive digs at Dan Brown & Da Vinci code - author really does have an issue here.

The general story was OK, some major inaccuracies ... such as paying for tickets in Cornwall in Euro ... (UK does not use Euro)
If you suspend credulity and read it for light entertainment then it is good, keeps you wanting to read the next chapter .... until the last one ..!!
Either the author could not come up with a way to finish, or was under time constraints, but the last chapter spoilt the whole thing.
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on 11 April 2012
To date I have read all three of the Templar themed and titled novels by the author Paul Christopher. I can say that with all three the premise and action in the book as resulted in me engaging with the story and wanting to read to the end, but when I finish them I feel a familiar sense of anti-climax.

The main character is likeable (even though the name John 'Doc' Holliday may seem a bit stereotypical) and the pace with which he travels across the globe is always entertaining with suspense and action in abundance. However I think the main problem with these stories is that the mystery or the artefact that the character is pursuing becomes slightly tedious and in the end uninteresting. The story tends to get built up and then a bit muddled and by the end, it just doesn't feel satisfying enough.

When you reach the end there is a taster of what I presume to be the fourth in the series and I shall probably buy it to see if there is a final conclusion to the series as I hope it reaches a big end sooner rather than later.
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on 29 May 2012
I thought that Templar Throne was definitely a da Vinci Code rip off, not that da Vinci Code is brilliant either. The author even has his characters criticise da Vinci Code in this novel which is really ironic. However, I was sort of putting up with the story until I reached the chapter where the main characters visited St Michael's Mount and paid their entrance fee in Euros. Er, the currency is pounds in the UK Mr Christopher. I was willing to suspend my belief but then a helicopter full of SO19 officers start pursuing them which one character tells the other are the British equivalent of a SWAT unit in the USA. Er, SO19 became CO19 in 2005 (Templar Throne was written in 2010) and are part of the Metropolitan Police Force anyway so they are unlikely to be found at St Michael's Mount as the Devon and Cornwall Police are the local police force. It's like finding LAPD running round the streets of New York. Then they meet an Irish fisherman who helps them because he tells them that he hates Limeys. Everyone knows that Limey is a slang term that Americans use for British people. An Irishman would never call someone from the UK a Limey; he would call them a Brit.

I don't know how accurate Mr Christopher's 'facts' about the Knights Templar, the crusades etc were but when I read inaccurate stuff in the rest of the book, it kind of calls into question everything else that I have read. Why don't authors just double check their facts and why don't publishers run a quality check on this sort of thing?
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on 28 May 2014
I am trying to gradually purchase the whole series of these books. So far I have enjoyed all of them, and presume to a point they do contain facts which I was not aware of. Very good reading.
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on 6 September 2013
I was not sure how to rate this story but it was one which I couldn't put down so I guess it merits a 4 rating. Never read any of Paul Christopher 's novels but I will probably read another.
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