Learn more Download now Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle New Album - Tom Chaplin Learn more Shop Women's Shop Men's

Customer reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
34
3.8 out of 5 stars
Foe (Penguin Essentials)
Format: Paperback|Change
Price:£6.99+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


on 9 October 2015
A very thought provoking book. Basically a reworking of Robinson Crusoe (Daniel Defoe's original name was Foe). It has a woman narrator who was washed ashore on a desert island where there was another castaway called Cruso already there. Susan is eventually rescued and approaches Foe to tell her story. Coetzee is more interested in looking at who controls narrative and who decides what stories should contain rather than just retelling a story. This is a postmodern novel, very intricate, complex but well worth taking time over. The ending is extremely interesting. Strongly recommended.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 14 August 2017
Great book.

Good service: received as described and fast delivery. Thank you
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 22 July 2017
Coetzee's rewrite of Defoe's Robinson is simply stunning. For those who are into postmodern irony and rewrites!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 10 August 2013
This is an exceptionally original and clever novel, but definitely has to be read together with Defoe's ROBINSON CRUSOE.

I shall certainly read both again.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 18 April 2017
dialogism at its purest
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 7 October 2015
Great
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 15 June 2017
Full of skilled narrative trickery, with ; little to make ypou care.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 5 August 2017
Good condition
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 10 May 2012
This is a book I had to read for my English degree and I would advise that it is best read in conjunction with Robinson Crusoe as it is a literary reworking of that. This book primarily seeks to deromanticize the heroic island myth and present the reality of the silenced other and colonialism. Wordy part aside, it is worth a read, although you may want to do some further reading around the ending and avoid reading that section at 3am - it can be rather confusing.

I understand all the literary devices at work here, but I must admit that I found Susan an almost unbearable heroine, the spider imagery used within the book certainly seems to sum up her character - she is something of a parasite. This is not a light fiction book to enjoy by a pool, but if you want something that probably ticks the intellectual box, it is worth a go.
0Comment| 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 7 March 2012
"Foe" begins like an epic poem requiring all six senses to tune in. Our protagonist is a young woman struggling to survive. She fascinates like a spider constructing her web. Her rhythmic motions, her sensual fiber, her instinctive powers and her appetite for natural beauty guide the scene with all its vital ingredients--terror, exhaustion, suspicion, satisfaction, failure, passion, anger, triumph. With the completion of the web, in all its silky and resilient perfection, the reader exalts in the young woman's victory, but not for long.

This is not a straightforward story. The reader has fallen into the web or so it seems. Frustration at first irritates and then infuriates. The memory of a beautiful tale drifts out of focus. Truth evades. The reader, overcome by his incapacity to react wraps himself in a sticky state of inertia--a frail observer of a ever more vanishing truth. But not all webs are constructed to trap a prey. Spiders sometimes simply gloat with the pleasure over a perfect exercise.

And so very slowly after the mental anguish there comes the relaxed appreciation of an unreachable beauty, a truth suspended forever in time like John Keats' lovers on a Grecian urn. "Forever wilt thou love and she be fair!" A vision of an unattainable success.

J. M. Coetzee deserves a poet's laurel wreath for this hypnotizing portrait of human turbulence. I highly recommend J.M. Coetzee's "Foe".
0Comment| 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse


Need customer service? Click here