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3.7 out of 5 stars
33
3.7 out of 5 stars
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on 28 February 2014
Some very thought provoking passages. Perhaps it's a little to evangelical in tone and, therefore, comes across as preaching as much as analysis. Therefore, one must read this though the same eyes as the author himself advises one consumes news. Be conscious that it, as well as its subject, has an agenda.

Nonetheless, it adds much to ones thoughts about a pervasive aspect of our everyday lives.
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on 10 February 2015
It's been a rather long time that I read a book which so utterly surprised me. Alain de Botton's reflections on news are fascinating, really very deep and eloquently expressed. I loved it.
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on 14 March 2014
This book is the kind of redux the digital age really needs. It's all you need to know about to how to build cognition out of information overload. Very well played Alain de Botton.
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on 21 July 2015
Not as cohesive as his other books. Some good points made and it did cause me to think about the news I consume and how I consume it but overall this could have been better.
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on 13 September 2015
This book is shallow and patronising. It's also very padded out, there's about 100 pages worth of actual text. Not worth buying
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on 25 February 2014
I find de Botton's lack of either logic or plain facts infuriating. Most of what he accuses the media of not doing, they do, and vice versa. He keeps putting up Aunt Sallies to be knocked down by his oh so deep thinking.
He wants the news to recognise the nice and the ordinary, as well as the nasty and sensational. Does he really think people want to read that the sun is shining on the daffodils this morning? But wasn't yesterday?
Another example-he criticizes the business pages for being full of share prices and obscure financial jargon, rather than describing the really exciting things that are going on within industry. I have never read a newspaper that did not do the latter as well as the former. What is he reading? The Stockbrokers Almanac or the Daily Telegraph/Guardian/Times?
But then he never identifies the actual medium that he is attacking, just gives the odd quote. Generalisation from anecdote.
He writes well, and has a command of the language, but is using this talent in an empty cause.
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on 2 May 2015
Happy to have received a signed copy and just within a few days!
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on 6 February 2014
Alain's latest has all the charms and strengths of his other work. It is lucid, funny and perceptive. It genuinely made me think about the way I consume media - and made me want to be a lot more careful! Highly recommended.
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on 3 March 2014
An interesting perspective on the way daily news is presented to the public. Does not give enough on the ways in which photography enhances our understanding of many news stories.
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on 14 February 2014
This is a great book that contains more than just an investigation into the news. Whilst De Botton does, chapter by chapter, examine the purpose and historical connections between different sections of the news: celebrity, politics, disaster etc. He also provides many strong insights into human psychology of WHY we are drawn to certain stories, and HOW they affect us.

Although De Botton provides practical ideas on how to navigate the news in your own life, which are great, his suggestions to Journalists seem rather idealistic, and I cannot see them ever happening. That however, is probably not a good thing.

I'd recommend anyone who reads the news to read this, which is mostly everyone.
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