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on 9 September 2015
Very interesting and disturbing. Seems that a fair proportion of commanders shouldn't ever have been given commands. Of course some were political appointees and got a lot of men killed and maimed for reasons of incompetence and personal pride. A good read nonetheless.
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on 12 May 2017
Lovely hardback. Got it for my partner and he loves it.
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on 11 June 2017
Blunders exposed
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on 12 August 2017
Nice book...Can't believe what am reading..
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on 27 December 2016
I rarely comment on books, but feel I must on this one. If I didn't know the author trained as a schoolmaster at a time when political cynicism and fuzzy-minded do goodery combined to wreck the British education system, I'd be compelled to conclude that he was a mere tabloid journalist. His smug condemnation of better men than himself, ignoring historical and practical context alike, is shameful to the last degree. He makes no claim to relevant experience either as a practical seaman or as a fighting commander, yet feels able to sneer at the efforts of seasoned professionals, doing (mostly) the best they could with what they had. Certainly, with hindsight, there were mistakes made, but this author is the wrong person to tell us about them. A disgracefully tawdry, shallow hatchet job.
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HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERon 30 June 2012
Geoffrey Regan is described as "Britain's premier authority on military disasters" and, with the word "Blunders" in several of the titles of his previous books, he is certainly well qualified to provide an accurate account of those that are part of the world's naval history.

"The Brassey's Book of Naval Blunders" is a soft cover book measuring 9¾" x 7½" containing 182 pages of detailed information on various historic naval encounters from around the world. There is a good selection of supporting B&W photographs throughout. In an easy-to-read style of writing - and following a two-page introduction, the author commences with an account of the 18,000 mile journey of the Russian Fleet in 1905 and how two-thirds of that fleet were lost when they finally came up against the Japanese. Likening some of those involved to the Marx Brothers is an apt comparison and a good indication of what is to follow.

Part I of the book is then divided in chapters headed "Lunatic Admirals" - in which we are treated to no fewer than 16 excellent tales to fit that particular heading, "Tale of a Tub" - 10 instances of ship design ranging from a circular battleship to vessels that torpedoed themselves, "The Price of Admiralty" - where all the ultimate life-costing decisions are made by the governments and civil-servants-in-uniform of the day, "A Life on the Ocean Wave" - 6 tales of life aboard ship, "Above us the Waves" - various tales of submarine design left wanting (including the dreadful K-class) and "That Sinking Feeling" - recounting the loss of several well known vessels including the Mary Rose and HMS Vanguard.

Part II is simply headed "Case Studies" and is exactly that, the case studies of 22 important naval battles ranging from Drepana in 250 BC to Leyte Gulf in 1944. Whilst I had not previously heard of Drepana - I never realised how Leyte Gulf was such a close-run thing.

Altogether, this is a fascinating book, an excellent read and the answer to an awful lot of questions about naval warfare in general, the outcome of several naval engagements in particular and the fate of certain specific ships..

NM
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on 6 April 2013
Learned a lot from this book and found it very enjoyable. Would recommend it to any history buff. More for adults than children
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on 15 February 2014
This is a very interesting and immersing account of the often poor leadership qualities that naval commanders and their political bosses exhibited.

It begs the question just how Britain ruled the waves, considering the many cock-ups that took place!

The annoying aspect is the large number of typographical errors which are scattered through the book. Considering the number of reprints this book has had, one would have expected the author to actually have read what he has written and taken the opportunity to remove them.

Despite this, the book should be a welcome addition to any history reader's bookshelf.
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on 7 December 2014
Bought as a Christmas present, very nice interesting book. A lot of good information and some very good pictures. Very pleased with this book well presented.
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on 18 January 2014
I bought this book as I have read Regan' Naval Blunders and I assumed as it was titled Great Naval Blunders it would be a sequel. Not so, it is exactly the same book just a different title.
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