Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Amazon Music Unlimited for Family Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's

Customer Reviews

2.8 out of 5 stars
6
2.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
3
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 11 June 1999
I looked briefly at the one-star reviews of this book, and for a moment wondered if they had read a different book. This book was wonderful. I read it at the end of a several-month visit to India, while I was in Calcutta. Having read and written (in university and during my visit) about other contemporary authors dealing with the subcontinent's history and weaving it together with their personal histories in novels, essays, and other works--Rushdie, Seth, Desai, etc.--I still found Suleri utterly original and provacative. One of these reviews uses the word 'incomprehensible'; Suleri's articulate and sometimes absolutely perfect sentences are much less deserving of the term than the review itself. Read it again--you missed something.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 4 July 1998
Sara Suleri's command on the English language is of course quite clear from the first page. She is among the few contemporary writers who dare to use difficult words without feeling apologetic about looking 'prententious." Bravo! Of course the words are used very appropriately as well. We need a revival of good English usage -- after all what's the point of testing kids on SATs.
Among South Asian writers she is a rare breed to balance a love for their homeland with candid criticism (unlike the much too celebrated Rushdie or Roy). She is an intellectual in the highest tradiation -- it is no wonder that a University Press published this book instead of some market-frenzied publishing house.
I disagree with some of her irreverent portrayal of Muslim society and traditional values but that is all tempered by the sardonic cadence of the work.
Hope you will write a novel as well.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 3 July 2013
Very good memoir. Beautiful formal, precise, and vivid prose. History of Pakistan. Intimate in places. Recommend it to all enthusiasts of postcolonial fiction. Strong narrative, I have one chapter left.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 15 March 1999
I found whole sentences, paragraphs, incomprehensible. I just don't understand her and what she is trying to get at.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 11 September 1998
Ms Suleri perhaps falls victim to high expectations. Instead of trying to be her own self she wants to maintain B.Sidhwa's wit and Rushdie's somberness and guile in portrayal of her confused childhood.
The book while appealing to a westerner wishing to get a superficial insight into a Pakistani family, is a complete waste of time for someone who has had even a slight exposure to sub continent litreature
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 11 September 1998
Ms Suleri perhaps falls victim to high expectations. Instead of trying to be her own self she wants to maintain B.Sidhwa's wit and Rushdie's somberness and guile in portrayal of her confused childhood.
The book while appealing to a westerner wishing to get a superficial insight into a Pakistani family, is a complete waste of time for someone who has had even a slight exposure to sub continent litreature
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Customers also viewed these items

£10.99
£7.19

Need customer service? Click here

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)