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on 14 March 2014
The best book I have read since my son died three years ago. Grossman is a master of metaphor. He knows about a parents grief inside out - its complicated and simple both at the have all been stripped away. When the man decides to go there, there is of course no 'there' and his wife knows that if he goes he will not come back - all bereaved parents will have expressed this desire to see their child just one more time and most will have contemplated suicide as the means to that end. Grossman explores the horror and the ultimate impossibility of such thoughts with huge imagination - grotesque in parts, certainly otherworldly but always grounded in real emotion. Written as a long form poem and presented as a stage script Falling out of Time has echoes of both Shakepeare and Beckett and will be read as such. But it is no less original for that.

When my son died - time did indeed stop. And I have been going round in circles ever since. I am now more ready to accept this as my own fate.
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on 1 April 2014
Set in a nameless village, this is a harrowing account of a group of grief-stricken parents mourning the death of their children. Written in very short sentences, the novel takes the form of a long poem of mourning. The sparse use of language and visceral flow of words captures the horror of parental loss in a way I have rarely seen. Each page gauges your emotions and you reach the end feeling emotionally utterly drained for you too have vicariously experienced this unbearable loss.
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on 1 January 2017
Almost unbearable to read - the pain of grief described in a mixture of poetry, prose, drama and monologue. A skilled translation of what must be even more powerful in the original.
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on 1 March 2014
Most unusual and a book that touches on so many depths. If you are finding your way through loss; work with bereaved; simply want to read something different, then I highly recommend this book.
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on 17 September 2015
I bought this without realising that it was written as verse with narrative interspersed so at first I was taken aback, thinking I wouldn't have bought this if I'd known... but gradually I was taken over by the power of the words, the rhythms, the sounds in my head, the emotions. So many passages were memorable - I will read it again, it gives a comfort that I think we all need.
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on 4 May 2014
Astonishing book if hard to follow st times. Highly recommend it to anyone who enjoys poetry as well as prose
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on 16 December 2014
Very moving especially after reading 'To the End of the Land'. A short read that is personal and deeply felt.
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on 18 July 2014
Great read if you fancy being plunged into deep blue, sad times.
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on 28 April 2015
David Grossman is a very good Israeli novelist
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on 21 October 2015
Bought as a gift, hopefully to help.
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