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4.7 out of 5 stars
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4.7 out of 5 stars
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on 30 December 2012
Highly recommend this book.
Funny and insightful in to the world of English football.
Should defo read it.
You may end up liking him
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 22 November 2013
I must say I found this book a top read, as Mr Jordan tears into all and sundry - be they FA twits, lazy footballers or egotistical board members. Oh, and football agents - the bane of his life, it would appear. I am not a Palace fan - Wolves are my poison of choice - but this book appealed to me on many different levels. First up, it was the tale of someone working - or blagging - his way to the top of the tree, as the best job Mr Jordan seemed capable of, when first setting out in the world of high finance, was that of a salesman. To be honest, given his background in such like, it was amazing he was ever sold on the idea of owning a football club, given the parlous state of affairs that entails. Still, no matter, it was a good read, as the reader gets to know and appreciate all the nonsense that goes hand in hand with football. As for the author himself, what kind of impression are you left with? Well, although at times he comes over a bit 'look at me, aren't I a clever chappie with lots of famous friends' one cannot help but admire the way he refuses to lie down and take the rubbish that life throws our way. He really should have been adopted by Mrs Thatcher when a boy, she would have been perfect for him!
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on 8 June 2012
Great book, Jordan doesnt mess about showing up Chairman, Managers, Players and Agents for the Mercenary rubbish they are, a truly interesting insight into the goings on at all Football Clubs not just at Palace.
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on 23 March 2017
Twice now lve read this and its an even better read second time around. Simon Jordan writes a frank and honest story, one that will leave you shocked and speechless. He commanded respect, high standards and hard workers from his employees, nothing wrong with that. A truly great book.
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on 8 June 2012
I'd say it was "unputdownable" as a Palace fan, but after an entire evening I needed sleep, so I had to put it down just the once.

You don't have to like him, or you may even think he's just too orange, but you'll enjoy this book. There are genuine laugh out loud bits, jaw-dropping parts, and after a baptism of fire with the f-word you get used to the direct language and the bloke's character.

You never know, one day Simon Jordan might show football what "bouncebackability" really means.
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on 8 January 2015
I am not a Crystal Palace fan but this is a must read for any football fan. This is by far the best football related autobiography I have read to date. Fast paced and highly addictive - I found it very hard to put down. The first part of the book charts his background and rise to a self made multi millionaire. I found this still very interesting and he condensed this into a few chapters giving the reader a brief synopsis of how he managed to make his millions. However the rest of the book, and quite frankly the reason why 99% of people would want to read it, charts his acquisition of Crystal Palace, his time at the helm and his subsequent demise. he leaves no stone unturned lifting the lid on his managers, players, the players agents and people from the FA. I think more importantly for me, unlike player/manager autobiographies, he is extremely honest and has no problem naming names. Maybe as he was a little more removed he had no problem exposing some very well known names in football. As a football fan my opinion of Simon Jordan has definitely improved, and I even have admiration for the way he stood up to quite frankly ludicrous established practices which were taken for granted within the football world, and for which in challenging, he was condemned and vilified by those within the game. I certainly have a lot more sympathy for football chairman who have a rather thankless task. Highly recommended.
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on 29 August 2012
Picked this book on Kindle whilst on holiday for no other reason than having seen the author some years ago on a 'not very good TV show'(as he says in the book) where he and others gave some of their money away, and having quite liked the way he came across, he seemed like an interesting person. Events described in the book have a ring of truth about them, and the tale held my interest, despite all the exclamation marks! And some repetition! And Simon has left some loose ends. I read it in a couple of sittings and learnt a lot about how football operates (awful), got to know some of the personalities that I see on the telly from time to time (managers and footballers), shared his disappointment at losing youth academy proteges to predatory managers and to the inevitable lure of money. Laughed out loud more than once, shook my head at the wasted money and the somewhat chaotic personal life running alongside. All in all I'm happy to have contributed towards rebuilding the Jordan fortune by buying this book, especially as there was a lot of bad luck involved in terms of timing. Shoulda woulda coulda... And I'm sure at some time, there will be a Part Two.
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on 5 June 2012
Ok, he can be a bit of **** at times, but you gotta love his attitude to life and honesty in his book. It's hugely entertaining and so refreshing to read a biog from someone who is not frightened to say what he thinks.
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on 6 June 2012
Simon Jordan really doesn't care who he might upset or get on the wrong side of.

He has a great sense of his own worth and infallibility and once you recognise this and take him with a pinch of salt then this book is a lot of fun, totally indiscreet and packed full of great stories.

Highly recommended and once you strip out the ego and hyperbole there are also some serious points to be made about the trials and tribulations of owning a football club.
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on 21 June 2012
This is truly a no holds barred insight into the world of football, and how it is run.

I'm sure every football fan questions the running of its club and some of its signings and stories from time to time, and this book really opens your eyes to the closed shop mentality of football, and how it really can be jobs for the boys. Simon Jordan tried to make football, and his club Crystal Palace, more professional and business minded, but often fought a lone battle.

A fascinating and entertaining read that is hard to put down, Jordan admits his mistakes, but also demonstrates a determination to succeed at all costs, most notably his. The most honest account of life inside football I've ever read, Jordan doesn't take any prisoners and makes his views on individuals in the game very clear. Presumably his side of the story is pretty accurate, otherwise he'll be spending a lot more time in court!!

By the end of the book you cannot help but like and respect the man, and agree with a lot of his views. Football is a less interesting and colourful (and not just orange) game without him. A great read and highly recommended.
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