Learn more Download now Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle The Grand Tour Prize Draw Learn more Shop Women's Shop Men's

Customer reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
19
4.7 out of 5 stars
Grandville Mon Amour (Grandville Series)
Format: Album|Change
Price:£15.18+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


on 15 December 2010
A psychotic murderer is condemned to hang for his crimes but he somehow escapes and makes his way from Blighty to Grandville where he begins to wreak a furious vengeance on a series of prostitutes. But what do these women have in common? Inspector LeBrock returns to Grandville hot on the heels of "Mad Dog" Mastock to stop his killing spree and bring him to justice. But what he finds as he begins to investigate the murders takes him back to the past when Britain was fighting for independence against the French, to an event called the Brick Lane Massacre, his own father, and a terrible conspiracy reaching to the highest echelons of power...

Bryan Talbot follows up his hit comic book "Grandville" from last year with "Grandville Mon Amour", the sequel. For those not familiar with the series, the characters are mostly animals in human-ish form, in a steampunk reimagining of the Victorian era with robots and flying machines thrown into the mix.

Talbot's art is nothing short of masterful. Each page contains a stunning array of illustrations, from detailed crowd scenes to richly coloured interiors. Talbot's writing is also of a very high standard with the plot hurtling forwards at all times making for a terrifically exciting read.

"Mon Amour" is a welcome return to the wonderfully realised world of "Grandville". It's a crime thriller but with darker overtones to the first book. Fantastic art, fantastic story, a great comic book from a true artist and storyteller, and a great read.
0Comment| 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 28 January 2015
If you've not heard of Grandville by now, you HAVE to get into this series. Mon Amour takes place three weeks after the first, and DI Archie LeBrock (no relation to Kelly, as far as I know) is mourning the loss of his beloved Sarah. A dangerous dog (remember, this is an anthropomorphized world where humans are slaves) escapes the guillotine and escapes to Paris where he murders a bunch of hookers. LeBrock is suspended from Scotland Yard after his outburst at not being given the case, though he follows the trail to Paris and investigates anyway.

Even if you took away the great artwork, the retro-futuristic/steampunk atmosphere, and the Holmes/Watson twist Grandville: Mon Amour would still be winner thanks to the innovative historic/contemporary political issues that contain the plot. Add it all together (including some sly pop-culture jokes) and you have one truly unique graphic novel/experience. A must buy, for anyone and everyone.

I don't want this series to end, and impatiently await the next.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 13 May 2011
If you've not heard of Grandville by now, you HAVE to get into this series (and yes, since we're at No. 2 it is a series now). Mon Amour takes place three weeks after the first, and DI Archie LeBrock (no relation to Kelly, as far as I know) is mourning the loss of his beloved Sarah. A dangerous dog (remember, this is an anthropomorphized world where humans are slaves) escapes the guillotine and escapes to Paris where he murders a bunch of hookers. LeBrock is suspended from Scotland Yard after his outburst at not being given the case, though he follows the trail to Paris and investigates anyway.

Even if you took away the great artwork, the retro-futuristic/steampunk atmosphere, and the Holmes/Watson twist Grandville: Mon Amour would still be winner thanks to the innovative historic/contemporary political issues that contain the plot. Add it all together (including some sly pop-culture jokes) and you have one truly unique graphic novel/experience. A must buy, for anyone and everyone.

I don't want this series to end, and impatiently await the next.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 1 January 2011
I loved Grandville, and was eagerly anticipating this sequel for the further adventures of D.I. LeBroc. Perhaps my expectations were set too high, but I came away with some disappointment from Mon Amour.
The art is as beautiful as ever, darker than the first book. The printing of the book screams quality, though the sticker on the back of my copy fell off when I read the book - not a big deal as I actually wanted to remove it anyway.

The story starts out in Talbot's usual enigmatic way, but from there rather plods along in pretty linear fashion. For me, the 'twist' ending was fairly predictable, and the 'mystery' is no match for the original.

In summary, a quality book, and a good read, but lacking the pace and interest of the first book. If you've read Grandville, temper your expectations slightly and you will enjoy it more.
0Comment| 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 29 August 2013
I'm not big on graphic novels, but I'm bowled over by the Grandville series, written and illustrated by Bryan Talbot. The title is a tribute to the 19th century French caricaturist, J J Grandville, whose depictions of people as hominid animals (and other things) helped inspire surrealism. In Mr Talbot's novels England has only recently gained independence from France, having been conquered by Napoleon two hundred years ago along with the rest of Europe. In this Steampunk world, all the people are animals, French is the universal language, and the name Grandville is sometimes applied to the Imperial City of Paris. The artwork is superb, and the style allows for subtle little jokes, dropping in characters from Tintin and Rupert Bear. The hero of Grandville, Grandville Mon Amour and Grandville Bête Noire is DI Archie LeBrock of Scotland Yard, a badger, whose sidekick is an elegant rat. LeBrock's character combines elements of Sherlock Holmes, Sam Spade and even Mike Hammer, and he needs all his intelligence and his courage to uncover political conspiracies that bring to mind the phrase `madmen wielding sceptres'. The tense England/France political situation parallels that of Ireland/UK not so long ago.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 4 January 2011
I really enjoyed the first book and to say this this second instalment brings more of the same is no criticism. The artwork and pace of the story are equally stunning and I was personally pleased to find less of the unsubtle (and unnecessary) political allegory.

The hero and his sidekick rise far enough above the clichéd cop kicked out the force to act on his own plot device to be engaging. He also has a soft spot for hookers, but while that might be a very familiar idea, few detectives are barrel chested badgers with a rat for a side kick.

The artwork is frequently stunning but never intrusive. In fact, the story goes at such a pace I found myself going back to take in the drawings and give them the time they deserved. The attention to detail is both admirable and engaging with many panels having the power to linger in the memory like classic movie scenes that would be minutes long to achieve the same resonance.

I could not escape the notion that Grandville will end up as a movie and that would be a fair reward for the author and artist, but do yourself a favour and read the books first. I gather there are to be further adventures for Inspector LeBrock and personally I can't wait.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 19 October 2014
This is the second in the graphic novel series, set in a steampunk fin de siècle London and Paris (known as Grandville). LeBrock has now left the police, but he is still involved in capturing Mad Dog Mastock who has mysteriously escaped from prison just before his execution and then goes to Grandville to murder a group of prostitutes. LeBrock, with his faithful sidekick Ratzi, makes the link between Mad Dog’s work for the English resistance against France before independence was won, and an enigma that goes to the very top of the English political establishment. It is a good, wonderfully violent comic-book stuff.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 17 May 2011
Grandville Mon Amour takes up the story 3 weeks after Grandville's explosive finale. The artwork is superb and the overall presentation in hardback definitely adds to the package. Personally I think the storyline is the equal of Grandville and if you enjoyed the first instalment you will definitely enjoy the second. This time Inspector LeBrock is on the trail of a psychotic ex-guerilla-fighter mass murderering escaped prisoner with shady links to the political elite - so just another ordinary case for him....thoroughly enjoyable and highly recommended
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 21 October 2011
After reading and falling in love with the amazing original book I could not wait to get my sweaty hands on the follow up. I was not in any way disappointed. Maybe the story is a bit more obvious than it's predecessor but that is nit picking to a ludicrous degree. The art work is better and the book somehow more lush. You just have to love a hulking badger as the hero. Someone get Peter Jackson to make a film of these books.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 3 March 2013
I first came across Talbot around thirty odd years ago and his artwork is as good now as it was then. Lots of puns and digs at the French in the nicest possible way. However, the story is too compact and maybe this is a constraint due to the format. The drawings are detailed and fresh with great accuracy but there seems to be something lacking. I am a fan of comic books but was left wanting more.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse