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on 9 February 2010
Although the work for this book was completed many years ago, few industries seem to have benefited from the lessons described. Naysayers will dismiss the ideas because the data source is too old and "technology has moved on so much since then". The fundamental lessons though refer more to people than any specific technology and are probably even more valuable today than when the book was first published.
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on 17 August 1998
M3 teaches us the lessons of good software engineering. That the lessons (if not the particulars) are still timely and accurate after 20+ years, shows how far we have to go.
After owning this book for years, I still re-read selected passages before each new project. I step in tar from time to time, but the reasons are often contained in M3.
If you're preparing to buy a project scheduling package, STOP. Read M3 and learn the lessons.
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on 31 December 2016
Mostly just historical musings now. Best quote: "...I expect the [Windows] interface to be a historical relic in a generation." XD
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on 29 August 2006
I was working for several years in software development, exposed to systems engineering context before reading this book. I think Brooks was so right so long ago that this is "the absolute must read book" on software engineering for anyone interested.

Brooks writes in each chapter about different concerns that affect Software Engineering. The chapters include experiences the author had during his work in IBM back in the 70s. This makes it even more interesting since you actually learn about history of the craft. Note that the main content was written a while ago, but, much of it still applies in today's environment.

This edition includes the original essays and adds new content that comment on the book, the evolution of the field and what the author thinks is still applicable and what not.

As a whole it is very readable and many times fun to read. IMO this is a must read for anyone working in software engineering.
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on 16 February 2013
Except the "every development team needs a shared computer with 1 megabyte of RAM" part, Brooks ancient advice is still applicable today. Nails it, really. The book articulates lots of stuff that were on your mind before, and some you didn't realize.
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on 9 January 2000
This is an all-time classic work on project management. Though it is beginning to show its age, I still think that no engineering student should be allowed to graduate without having read this.
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on 5 November 1998
The Mythical Man-Month is a collection of papers on software engineering. It contains the classic pappers "No Silver Bullet", "The Mythical Man-Month", "The Second-System Effect" and others. Every software project manager should read these. I only rated this 4 stars because the book has become somewhat out of date on some issues. It assumes the reader is using primitive software development techniques and for that reason a FEW of the observations don't hold true today. Never the less this book is a classic and if you wan't to be "in the know", you must read it.
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on 6 December 2010
A legendary text but less than relevant these days. At its core are principles that don't date but it's relevance is to the history of the development of computer software systems. An entertaining read nonetheless.
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on 30 December 2012
As with all classics, the lessons found in there are timeless.
Brooks' observations are always sharp, crisp and to the point.
A got to read for managers, engineers and many more...
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on 18 November 1997
I did indeed like this book and certainly would recommend it as reading material for software engineering managers and supervisors. Since it was originally written about 20 years ago, it is a bit out of date but is very interesting. As it is said "...you don't know where you are going unless you know where you have come...". I particularly found the mention of "...implementing a counter in transistors..." definitely showed the age of the book :-). However, It is very direct and not drawn out, my favourite part of the book is the very concise but yet detailed summary of the book. A definite winner...
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