Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Click Here Shop Kindle Amazon Music Unlimited for Family Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 5 May 2017
Good value for money
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 29 April 2016
Arrived safely in good condition. The play, of course, lived up to expectations, having been written by an experienced and reputable playwright!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Shakespeare’s Henry VI comes in three parts and is usually placed together with Richard III to cover the what we now call The War of the Roses. To a certain extent how Shakespeare wrote and portrayed Henry have come to be the general attitude about the king, someone who was weak willed and easily led, which although there is perhaps some truth in this isn’t really that straight forward. The main problem with Henry VI is that he was a good person, or tried to be, but didn’t really have the power and determination needed to be a strong king.

The play opens just after the death of Henry V. His young son is recognised as the next king, although he was only about nine months old at the time, thus a Protector has been appointed to hold the kingdom in his name until he is old enough. Alas for Henry VI he has ‘inherited’ trouble in France with the Hundred Years War and thus there is fighting over the seas. With another claiming that he has a better right to the throne than the new king there is also machinations behind the scenes at court.

And so we see a young king come to power to find that his territories are diminished in France and that a number of his nobles are quarrelling amongst themselves. For Henry he just wants some peace and the stopping of hostilities at home, and to see what is going on in France and by his appearance gather loyal supporters around him. But as we see here things don’t go according to plan, and there are battles, deaths and treachery afoot.

Shakespeare portrays Joan of Arc here with some hesitation. We at first see her as someone who is holy, but then this does alter and she comes across as someone being used and lastly as a witch and in contact with the supernatural. This may seem strange to us, but Joan was accused of certain crimes that meant she was burnt at the stake, but later was found innocent by the Church and was then treated as a martyr. Of course to the French she was a heroine anyway, but to us a thorn in the side. With her portrayal here it seems that perhaps Shakespeare was trying to play to everyone by changing how she is perceived throughout the play.

Another character who is portrayed differently to what we would expect these days is Margaret of Anjou who is portrayed here as a lover to the Earl of Suffolk who manages to convince the king to marry her so as to not only have her pleasure but to also manipulate the king. We know there were rumours that Margaret slept around with a few of the noblemen, but there is a difference between a rumour and the truth.

Admittedly the Henry VI plays are not the most popular of Shakespeare’s works but that does not mean that they are not interesting and give an insight into how people felt about the life of this king at the time this and the other parts were written.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 27 October 2012
I was lucky enough to see Michael Boyd's production of Henry VI part one is his epic History Cycle in the Courtyard theatre in 2006. Prompted by that experience I thought I would delve a little deeper into these underperformed plays and what jewels I found.

Michael Taylor's editing of this edition is superb and the layout of the text and notes stunning. The prose and poetry is sublime and deeply moving. The centrepiece for me has to be the relationship between Talbot and his son who are left beached in France by treachery. Deeply moving, Shakespeare chronicles their love as they fight together for King and Country.

Joan of Arc is another highlight of the play and her story and background is fascinating.

This is a must for Shakespeare scholars and any reader of English History.
0Comment| 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 15 December 2016
ok
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Shakespeare’s Henry VI comes in three parts and is usually placed together with Richard III to cover the what we now call The War of the Roses. To a certain extent how Shakespeare wrote and portrayed Henry have come to be the general attitude about the king, someone who was weak willed and easily led, which although there is perhaps some truth in this isn’t really that straight forward. The main problem with Henry VI is that he was a good person, or tried to be, but didn’t really have the power and determination needed to be a strong king.

The play opens just after the death of Henry V. His young son is recognised as the next king, although he was only about nine months old at the time, thus a Protector has been appointed to hold the kingdom in his name until he is old enough. Alas for Henry VI he has ‘inherited’ trouble in France with the Hundred Years War and thus there is fighting over the seas. With another claiming that he has a better right to the throne than the new king there is also machinations behind the scenes at court.

And so we see a young king come to power to find that his territories are diminished in France and that a number of his nobles are quarrelling amongst themselves. For Henry he just wants some peace and the stopping of hostilities at home, and to see what is going on in France and by his appearance gather loyal supporters around him. But as we see here things don’t go according to plan, and there are battles, deaths and treachery afoot.

Shakespeare portrays Joan of Arc here with some hesitation. We at first see her as someone who is holy, but then this does alter and she comes across as someone being used and lastly as a witch and in contact with the supernatural. This may seem strange to us, but Joan was accused of certain crimes that meant she was burnt at the stake, but later was found innocent by the Church and was then treated as a martyr. Of course to the French she was a heroine anyway, but to us a thorn in the side. With her portrayal here it seems that perhaps Shakespeare was trying to play to everyone by changing how she is perceived throughout the play.

Another character who is portrayed differently to what we would expect these days is Margaret of Anjou who is portrayed here as a lover to the Earl of Suffolk who manages to convince the king to marry her so as to not only have her pleasure but to also manipulate the king. We know there were rumours that Margaret slept around with a few of the noblemen, but there is a difference between a rumour and the truth.

Admittedly the Henry VI plays are not the most popular of Shakespeare’s works but that does not mean that they are not interesting and give an insight into how people felt about the life of this king at the time this and the other parts were written.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
And so we come to the second play by Shakespeare of Henry VI, this part usually being considered the best of the three. Henry is married to Margaret of Anjou which is considered disgusting by some as she brings no dowry and no lands for England. With Suffolk still at his old game of plotting he with Margaret decide to have Gloucester stripped of his role as Protector.

With Gloucester’s wife accused of occult activities and banished so the plotting continues as Gloucester is made to resign his office. Who is now in control of the kingdom? Is it the king, or is it his wife and Suffolk? And as Gloucester is about to find out, his troubles are only just beginning.

With Henry on the throne and seemingly not as decisive and as quick as he should be so machinations go on at court as others try to place themselves in position to usurp the king and take his place. There is trouble in Ireland, conspiracies, a revolt at home and lots of action here to keep you entertained.

With treachery, treason, murder and foul plots will Henry be able to see them all off in this, which is really a game of thrones. With some quite macabre scenes it is a dangerous world that Shakespeare conjures up, where one can go far and then lose one’s head in a relatively short period. Shakespeare did use historical sources for this, although he did add fiction, and brought at least two incidents more or less together to keep up the flow, rather than extending the play, which I am sure for many, is a relief.

Although the three plays that make up the Henry VI trilogy are not the most popular by Shakespeare it has to be admitted that they are very much still worth reading.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 September 2013
Good value, as the book's in excellent condition. Happy also with the despatch and service. Nothing more to add, except thanks.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 2 March 2016
Excellent product and service.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 8 May 2014
The item arrived promptly and in very good condition. I was very pleased with this: It's a great way of getting familiar with the slightly less popular works of the bard,.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse



Need customer service? Click here

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)