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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 13 October 2014
Like the other single-text Oxford Shakespeares, this has an extensive and detailed introduction of over 100 pages. The problem faced by René Weis, though, is how to say something different from David Bevington in his Henry IV Part 1. The debate about whether we should think of the two plays as a continuation or as quite separate sustains the intoduction but, inevitably, there is duplication in the discussion of Falstaff, and the thematics of fathers/sons.

These modern-spelling editions are designed with the student or scholar in mind with useful on-page glosses and notes, textual variants, and a robust sewn binding - recommended as an very good study or work edition.
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on 4 March 2011
Henry IV Part II, is not as exciting as part I, it lacks a lot of the content that helped move part I along (it has been said that perhaps it was simply written as a money maker as Part II was immensely successful following its first performance) but otherwise it is equally well constructed.
The edition offers the usual copious historical and contextual information in the introduction but as with many of the Oxford Shakespeare; it occasionally lacks explanations for what feels like vital vocabulary and phrases. The information that isn't provided is easily accessible online but when you don't want to be referring to the internet whilst trying to read the play, it can be a little irritating and certainly interrupts your flow. I find the Arden Shakespeare are much better for providing the right amount (concise) historical and lexical information underneath the main body of the text, so that you can quickly refer to it as you read, which is more suitable for the heavier, more demanding history plays.
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on 4 June 2016
Hal, son of Henry IV, starts to calm down. The rebels still threaten the throne. Hal makes good in the end, dropping Falstaff, and in the process becomes King Henry V.
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on 15 June 2015
I like the Oxford School Shakespeare better. This has too small writing for me [poor eyesight]
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on 28 September 2014
excellent for revision,good price prompt delivery
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on 17 May 2011
This book arrived promptly and in perfect condition. It was offered at a reduced price and, in addition, there was no charge for the postage making it a very economical purchase.
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on 12 July 2015
Nicely edited.
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