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on 20 October 2017
Keeps up the high standards set by other "Very Short Intro" books. Well written and clear.
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on 23 May 2017
Good I like these short introductions . They make easy reading without the unnecessary garble
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on 3 December 2007
Sometimes we approach books like this because we want a 'taster' but have no intention of going any further with the subject. May I suggest that this book is not likely to fit the bill here or excuse us from reading Nietzsche? The reason being that Nietzsche is a philosopher who is particularly difficult to systematise and, as such, there don't appear to be any convenient shortcuts which will allow us to bypass tackling his work directly.

Having said this, for anyone who has read any Nietzsche, this is a superb book. Michael Tanner has organised things following a roughly chronological order and clearly has an outstanding feel for his subject.

Having read most of Nietzsche's published work and numerous other books about Nietzsche, this is a book which I consider to be a 'must read' for any enthusiast. It would surprise me if anyone read this book and found that their appreciation of Nietzsche wasn't enhanced in the process.
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on 14 February 2011
One of the best, relatively recent, short introductions to Nietzsche. Although the translations used for quotations on occasion provoke despair, the approach is very well ordered (unusual for commentaries on Nietzsche),analytical, discerning and stimulating.
The quotations are well chosen and illustrate the difficulties of reading Nietzsche as well as the pleasures.Well worth the price.
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on 18 December 2000
This book, one of a series of 'Very Short Introductions' presents Nietzsche from a broadly chronological viewpoint, mainly covering his work, but also extending into his life. It is written by someone with an obviously extensive knowledge of his subject, and an authoritative, gratifyingly honest approach. Possibly more importantly, Tanner seems to have a very good 'feel' for Nietzsche's intentions, something crucially important to studies of the idiosyncratic, often challenging approach of this particular philosopher. Speaking as an undergraduate student embarking on a dissertation study of Nietzsche, I found this book to be an extremely good introduction to the depth of the man's work, and would heartily recommend it to anyone with any interest in modern philosophy.
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on 16 November 2014
Started the book, read about 50 pages and I had nothing to show for it. I'm very interested in philosophy and have read a lot of books on the subject, however this was very complex and I struggled to grasp any of his teachings. I would have appreciated an introductory chapter that outlined his main beliefs and ideas.
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on 7 January 2014
Therefore I am or some such philosophical nonsense. It is too long as a short introduction, it it satisfied the person it was bought for.
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on 1 July 2016
If you're looking for quick introduction to Nietzsche, this book will do the job. Nietzsche's life, his philosophical influences, and his basic philosophical ideas are covered in a short and compact way. For the beginning student of Nietzsche, it will propel you to further study. For the seasoned reader, the book will serve as a helpful review.

Readers of this book may also like "Jenna's Flaw," a novel about Nietzsche, the death of God, the crumbling of Western civilization, and what the West can do to stop it.
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on 9 October 2010
I didn't expect to have his works explained in 3/4 short sentences but often the syntax was as complicated as Nietzsche's. If nothing else a list of his most significant insights & where they are to be found & an idiot's guide to the main works (perhaps as appendices)would be a great help to lay readers like me.
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on 17 April 2016
Unfortunately, I found this book to be the very opposite of the claims on its back cover: it is not an introduction, it is not highly readable and it is not a stimulating way into a new subject. Instead it is a rather pompous, academic overview of Nietzsche's works, that is full of lengthy, tortuous sentences, filled with abstractions and laced with the obscurities of a philosopher's vocabulary and unnecessary acronyms. The author appears to know his subject well; but, rather than writing to enlighten the novice, his aim instead appears to be to swagger and posture in order to demonstrate his prowess in the subject, Michael Tanner comes across as having been ensconced in his ivory tower far too long to sensitively write a book on Nietzsche that eases the general reader gently into the latter's life and thoughts. Those interested in Nietzsche would be better advised to simply take the plunge and read his published works, rather than first enduring this excruciating book.
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