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on 4 June 2015
A wonderful and informing work on the plight of the American plantation slaves, with a strong religious content that illustrates the ways in which faith played a role in the lives of those with no hope of a better life in this world.

The very words that the "Masters" hoped would confirm the subjection of the "slave" to the "Master", served to give them a hope beyond their living death in this world. The difference between the minority humane "owners" and the bestial majority of the "owners" is brought home starkly and poignantly through the several threads of this great book.

Whilst the language is archaic in places, and the images often Victorian in their pathos, it is very worthwhile reading. A good on-line dictionary will be invaluable and reward consultation, for many unusual words are used and they always have a specific meaning.
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on 6 May 2017
I bought it very cheaply as it was needed for daughter's history lesson as they are studying the American Civil War.
This book explains the atrocities of slavery and how slaves were treated during the 19th century.
Would highly recommend reading this book as it is really good.
Also, the quality of the book was very good and it came in a very good condition.
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on 14 May 2017
Every person whether black, white or a mixture to whatever degree, should read this book. If they did, many of the atrocities we witness in today's society, would end. The story is thought-provoking and extremely profound. It makes you want to be a better person.
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on 27 April 2017
Fantastic book. Easy to read. Very important and free.
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on 26 April 2017
Very good reading, exactly as expecting.
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on 19 June 2015
Unabridged audio book.
The language and sentence formations are not modern day.
Not having read the book, this is an opportunity to listen, whilst cooking and house work.
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on 20 May 2017
classic book will last forever
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on 30 September 2013
Too many typing errors which made it difficult to follow the text of what otherwise would have been a thought provoking read.
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on 4 December 2007
Uncle Tom's Cabin is one of the most important and popular novels in literary history. One hundred and fifty years on it remains as controversial as it was at the time of its publication and has spawned the term Uncle Tom to describe black people who are excessively meek and submissive in the face of racial abuse and prejudice. The debate today though is not about the morality of slavery, which is universally reviled, but instead focuses on whether or not the author inadvertently demeans and degrades the very people for whom she sought both dignity and liberation.
The novel begins in relatively liberal Kentucky in the home of a `liberal' slave owner and his wife who are reluctantly forced to sell two of their slaves to an unscrupulous dealer due to severe financial difficulties. On hearing that her son is about to be sold, mulatto Eliza flees across a frozen river with her little boy and heads for free Canada with the aid of sympathetic Quakers, meeting up with her bitter, estranged husband along the way. In contrast, pious Tom accepts severance from his family and his fate at the slave auction with resigned docility and is fortunate at first to be reassigned to a family headed by another liberal-inclined slaver. It is here that we meet the golden-haired (of course) little angel Eva, daughter of Tom's new master and his unsympathetic wife. Eva has bottomless compassion for Tom and the other slaves and servants and is adored in turn until she dies in one of the most saccharine death scenes in literature, reminiscent of the death of Bambi's mother. Eva's father promises his daughter on her deathbed that he would grant Tom his liberty but this promise is ignored by Eva's mother after his death and Tom is resold to the theatrically evil dealer Legree.
If Uncle Tom's Cabin did not contain scenes of emotional power and lyrical writing it would have been long-since forgotten. Despite Tom's cringing servility and all the black characters being apparently trapped in some kind of evolutionary stasis, a moving sincerity flows throughout the book and the effect it had on the conscience of nineteenth century America cannot be overstated. However, the world has moved on (allegedly) and in the end, the cloying sentimentality and the disturbing notion that Congregationalist Christianity is the only means available for gaining the freedom and dignity of the gentle, saintly slaves and redeeming the souls of their corrupt masters become overwhelming.
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on 10 March 2016
Sent as gift
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