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on 24 December 2016
Beautifully written, this book transported me to the cruel schools and betrayals that tried to break Morrissey. In some part they might have succeeded. It is unconditional love from foreign parts that have kept his heart and soul afloat, and I thank them for he has made some of the music I love most during these years. Power to you Moz.
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on 4 October 2017
It does seem to be true that Morrissey has had a lot to deal with in his professional life and has been screwed over quite a lot. It's also more than clear that he knows a lot of famous people as the book is full of name-dropping. It's a decent read, certainly not a classic and this shows the problem with his arrogance, which he displays at times in this account of his life.
One big problem I have with it is its use of American spelling. I know he's successful there but please, an English author should only use English spelling.
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on 10 January 2015
Lets face it, Morrissey isn't always the most likeable guy. But even at his most unlikable he's an *interesting* unlikable guy.

This book is a brief look inside his head. Quite deprecating in places ("Childbirth nearly killed my mother, naturally I had a big head") and scathing in others (Mike Joyce fans look away). I am a big Smiths fan and I thought it was an interesting read, once you get past Morrissey's unique relationship with the English language---the writing style will definitely put some people off.

If you're looking for facts about the Smiths or about Morrissey, this probably isn't the book for you. But as an addition to the Smiths/Morrissey canon and an insight into a fascinating man its highly recommended.
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on 4 May 2014
Reviewing this book was never going to be easy. Morrissey blends poetry with wit and an ability to write that matches his musical output - wandering, meandering and complex. I have never been a great fan of the Smiths but wanted to get inside the man's head. Problem is he doesn't really allow us to do this. His details of spats and mischief become confusing as he dots around from one subject to another. As a study of a so called pop legend, it has limited appeal, as a piece of writing it is different and interesting. As they say you have to pay your money and take your choice.
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on 29 January 2017
Bear with it. If you're struggling fast forward 100 pages to the court battle. Vividly written and very enjoyable.
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on 4 October 2014
I enjoyed it. Initially I had chosen not to read this book because I am a huge fan of the Smiths and Morrissey and sensed my opinion of him would lessen on reading it since he is prone to bragging and making pretentious remarks. I did however enjoy it. It is witty for the most part and the writing is good enough, i felt, to keep you reading even though it does ramble, as i recall, from the account of the acrimonious court case to the end (of the book).

Coverage of the court case in the book by Moz is just ridiculous. We all know he felt hard done by but there is no need to go on about it. To be honest it's probably the best example in the book of Moz's self-indulgent, self-pitiful mentality but, hey, there would be no Smiths without it! It's just strange i find that, all these years later, after so much success and vindication of his talents which kept him aloof in his youth, he still feels the need to go on about how special he is. Yes Moz you are special and brilliant but keep it to yourself treasure..... on reflection i am reminded of a lyric of his:

"such things i do, to make myself attractive to you, have i failed?"

and the answer to that, after reading the autobiography, would have to be....er, kind of yes and no (as always)
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on 28 August 2017
Always interesting,sometimes gripping and often revealing.
I enjoyed this book,most of the content was enjoyable but found small sections lingered for too long. But' hey Morrissey',where would we be without you and love him or hate him you've got to love him.
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on 7 January 2015
I am a big Morrissey fan and although I gained enjoyment from reading this book I would say that he does come across as a bit of a moaner. He is a very eloquent writer, as you'd expect from his lyrics, but I didn't come away feeling that I understood the 'real' Morrissey. Maybe that was his intention. It focuses on certain parts of his life in great detail and other areas are merely brushed over. I would say it's an essential read for Morrissey fans though in spite of it's problems.
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on 3 July 2015
There's at least half a good book in here. The trouble is that there's way too much whining about the court case. This seems to drag on for ever. I did like Mozzer's writing style which does bode well for his up coming novel.
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on 31 March 2014
I'm afraid to say I am still trying to work my way through this. Morrissey writes a book like he writes a song, so if you are expecting a smooth ride you are in for a shock. Also doesn't seem to like paragraphs very much which is all well and good for doing things how he does them, but its hard to adjust if like me you have to adjust in the first place. Does that make sense?
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