Learn more Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Click Here Shop Kindle Amazon Music Unlimited for Family Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's

Customer reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
20
4.8 out of 5 stars
A Dog So Small (Puffin Modern Classics)
Format: Paperback|Change
Price:£6.99+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


on 23 September 2013
When I was teaching in primary schools in the late '70s and '80s this was our class reader - in four different schools, purchase of a class set arranged by me. It is an incredibly sensitive book with - despite anyone saying otherwise - has a happy ending. i was rather wet then and could never read the last chapter without being close to tears, so I used to get the kids to read that one! Incidentally, 'Minnow on the Say' is great, too.
0Comment| 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 5 September 2017
Good
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 8 October 2017
Very original and gets into the mind of a child
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 15 August 2014
Still a classic. Looking forward to sharing with the children in my class.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 24 October 2000
Someone bought me this book for my ninth birthday just before I got a dog of my own. For any child who has ever really, really wanted a pet, not just as a passing fad because their mates have got one or because they think all dogs are like Timmy from the Famous Five, but because they desperately want something to love and care for and be their companion, this book is for you. I'd wholeheartedly recommend it for any child who's the sensitive, thoughtful type.
The plot itself is by no means intricate, it's the ideas that count. It deals with the Ben, the main character, and the way he compensates for his own shortcomings and the gaps in his otherwise happy life by inventing an imaginary dog, the fearless chihuahua Chiquitita. But when he is finally presented with his dream of a real flesh and blood puppy, he learns that fantasy and reality are very different things.
I cried buckets the first time I read this aged nine and then did it all over again when I revisited it in my 20s for a university essay. I defy anyone to read the last few pages without being tempted to shout at loud at Ben to make him see sense...
0Comment| 39 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 17 May 2016
it was a lovely piece i nearly cried .It was a lovely experience.
my children thought it was incredible they wanted my to read it again and aagain
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 4 September 2008
This was one of my favourites as a child. I recently re-read "A dog so small" and was gripped again by the story, the beautiful writing and the atmosphere that the author conjures up.

The story is simple: a boy longs for a dog but is disappointed when all he receives for his birthday is a rather obscure cross-stitch picture from Mexico. But Ben soon uses the power of his imagination to fill the dog in the picture with life. While at first this is fun, Ben's obsession starts to have more negative effects as the boundaries between reality and fantasy become blurred.

What I like about this book is its emotional depth. Young readers are not shielded from the quite intense sometimes negative emotions that children can have. I read that Philippa Pearce had difficulty at first getting this book published as it was judged "depressing". But, although there are definite low points in the story, it does end on a beautiful high which stays with you for years.

I would recommend "A dog so small" to any imaginative child aged 8+ who wants a change from constant action, slapstick and gimmicks.
0Comment| 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 18 October 2012
This is a great book for young people, about Ben who lives in London. Ben would love a dog - a big dog, like a Borzoi, say. But there is no room. His family has no garden. So he decides maybe the only way is to have a dog so small you can only see it with your eyes shut.
Meanwhile his gran shows him a picture of a Chihuahua dog so he imagines this dog - Chiqitita - is following him around London. Poor, lonely Ben, with no friends, takes to riding the Tube all day, walking the streets, alone but for his dog so small that nobody else can see it. Obviously nobody should do this today, it would be very dangerous, and the story was written decades ago.
When his family suddenly moves to near Hampstead Heath the possibility arises that Ben could have a real dog, maybe Brown, from a litter of pups. But does he want a real dog, or does he want Chiqitita?
A very good story for pre-teens to adults.
11 Comment| 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 10 November 2001
This book is simply brilliant. Ben, a boy living in London, is desperate for a dog but he is pretty sure that his granddad is getting him one for his birthday. When he gets a picture of a dog instead, he is digusted and annoyed. Soon however, he starts seeing a little imaginary dog everywhere he goes and the two become very attached. Neither of them guess that the little dog will bring Ben so much harm.
This book is guaranteed to bring tears to your eyes. It is also guaranteed to bring smiles of happiness. A must-have book!
0Comment| 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 2 June 2017
A childhood favourite : glad I was a able to get hold of it and quickly.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse