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4.7 out of 5 stars
123
4.7 out of 5 stars
Chinese Cinderella: The Secret Story of an Unwanted Daughter
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on 15 March 2017
Ive been meaning to read this since I was in middle school but never got the chance to, primarily due to my laziness in reading. Im grateful I did end up reading it after being encouraged by my past english teacher and a friend.
Its an autobiography by Adeline Yen Mah and her childhood upbringing in a family that neglects most of her existence and achievements.
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on 15 April 2017
Ten years ago this book caught my attention and I loved it.
I knew when I bought a new shelf I had to get it again.

This copy was fresh and looks and feels good.
Its a thick but lightweight book.
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on 19 April 2017
I really loved the book. I could relate a lot to Adelines we Tory and she has persuaded me to still keep going on that it does get better. Definitely 10/10
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on 5 June 2015
I love it!
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on 12 December 2002
After being bought for me as a birthday present, I have now read this book soooooo many times, simply because it is very touching. It is the story of an unwanted child, who is rejected by her stepmother and mentally abused. To continue with this story, Falling Leaves, by the same author, is the full biography of her.
The book is simple, which is one of the reasons that it touches your heart. It will appeal to all ages, and is an ideal present, even if you don't read much.
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on 25 September 2015
I didn't realise that this was a children's book.
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on 1 January 2017
It’s rare for me to read autobiographical works as I’ve always been more of a fiction lover (this was actually a Christmas gift from a friend) but Chinese Cinderella makes up for the lack of a fantasy world with its immersion into 1940’s China and the changes it went through over a decade.
Adeline’s writing is simple, yet beautiful, and despite the horrors of the tale she tells I found it very easy to read. The account of her youth is devastatingly sad and page after page my heart ached for her.
Sadly, for me, this was also one of my negatives about this book. It is such a heartbreaking tale that it was almost hard for me to read. As a girl, she endured so much hardship and mistreatment from almost everyone around her and while I admire her courage it was a very heavy read. This is one of the reasons I don’t read autobiographies very often, life doesn’t work the same way that it does in fiction and there are rarely happy endings.

With so little light among the dark experiences Adeline endured I just kept wondering how much worse things could get for her. She deserved so much more love than she got and though she eventually found her own place in the world which was her happy ending, it was still tainted by her stepmother’s actions even at the end.

I rated this at 2.5, the story was such a difficult read because of all the mistreatment Adeline received and though the writing was beautiful it couldn’t make up for the level of negativity that runs throughout this story. A touching tale but not something I could read again.
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I was only 10 when I read this book but that didn't make it less moving or emotional. Now I am 11 and reread the book and thought I should do a review on it. OK you know the story by now... It's about a Chinese girl, having to live through ignorance and emotional abuse every day of every month of every year of her sad childhood until she is wickedly sent away to a boarding shool because her cruel stepmother cannot deal with her any longer.

I totally understand why some people think that Adeline Yen Mah/ Yen Jung-ling is selfish or trying to make people sorry for her. But by the pure way of how she wrote this book, I know that that is wrong. The message that she wants to get across to us is that millions of children are being ignored and treated like she was. Milions of people, now grown up, don't know what love is. They don't know what it is, and how to give it. Think how sad it must be, to not experience what love is, not having someone who care for you, who is proud of you.

I realy think this book deserves 5 stars because of the simpleness of the writing, and yet the complexity of the whole story, and the perfect emotion put into the story at the right times.

I would like to congratulate Mrs Mah on this amazing story.
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on 18 July 2006
This book is very, very good. It is well written and being from the point of view of a child it is very well constructed. It is heart breaking and very thought provoking through out.

It is a really easy book to read in terms of page layout and so on but Adeline Yen Mah has left out nothing of the more painful details, the story made me think all the way through about the cruelty suffered by author and how anyone can subject a child to such treatment.

I would recommend this to anybody but it is not something for the light hearted.
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on 14 September 2017
This book has been a favorite of mine since I was 15 years old, and I've reread it countless times I the 12 years since. I highly recommend it to anyone, but especially teenagers. There is a lot of historical information, as well as a beautiful message of hope. A truly stunning and well written book.
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