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3.4 out of 5 stars
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3.4 out of 5 stars
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A few days after returning from her honeymoon, Teresa leaves the room in the middle of dinner, goes to the bathroom and shoots herself in the heart. Years later, in the present, as our narrator Juan is getting used to the changes brought about his own marriage, he becomes fascinated by the mystery of why Teresa killed herself. He has a personal connection – his father Ranz was married to Teresa at the time and later married her sister Juana, Juan's mother. So Teresa would have been Juan's aunt – though had she lived, of course she wouldn't have been...

There are several themes going on in the book – the uncertainty of memory, the inability to forget something once heard, the increasing unknowableness of truth when stories are relayed from person to person. Both Juan and his wife Luisa are interpreters and the sections where Juan talks about listening and conveying meaning are fascinating. The title is a reference to Macbeth, specifically to Lady Macbeth's reaction on being told of Duncan's murder, illustrating a major theme - the complicity forced upon someone to whom a tale is told. Marías is also playing with the idea that events that are major in the present fade into insignificance as time passes, so that eventually all will be the same whether an event happened or didn't. An interesting thought.

In fact, there are lots of interesting thoughts hidden in Marías' prose – well hidden. This is yet another in what seems to be becoming my accidental theme of the year – stream of consciousness novels or, as I prefer to call them, badly punctuated. I admit this one is nowhere near as bad as Absalom! Absalom! But it's up there with Mrs Dalloway for sure, although Marías does at least manage eventually to get to the end of his sentences without completely losing track of where he was heading. There is no doubt that this style of writing lends the prose an air of profundity which, once one breaks the sentences down into their constituent parts, often evaporates, as one realises that the difficulty of comprehension is due not so much to the complexity of the ideas as the complexity of the sentence structure.

Another recurring feature of the few stream of consciousness novels I have waded through (or not, as the case may be) is the constant repetitiveness that the authors tend to employ, as if somehow repeating a thing a few dozen times will make it more meaningful. Perhaps it does, if one likes this style of writing – for me, it simply makes it tedious. An idea that intrigues on first mention requires expansion rather than repetition to hold this reader's interest, I fear.

To be fair, I hate this style in general, but I do think Marías does it much better than most. Much of what he has to say is perceptive, as for example in this quote about getting used to being married. (The style means any quote has to be a long one, so apologies.)

"As with an illness, this “change of state” is unpredictable, it disrupts everything, or rather prevents things from going on as they did before: it means, for example, that after going out to supper or to the cinema, we can no longer go our separate ways, each to his or her own home, I can no longer drive up in my car or in a taxi to Luisa's door and drop her off and then, once I've done so, drive off alone to my apartment along the half-empty, hosed-down streets, still thinking about her and about the future. Now that we're married, when we leave the cinema our steps head off in the same direction (the echoes out of time with each other, because now there are four feet walking along), but not because I've chosen to accompany her or not even because I usually do so and it seems the correct and polite thing to do, but because our feet never hesitate outside on the damp pavement, they don't deliberate or change their mind, there’s no room for regret or even choice: now there's no doubt that we're going to the same place, whether we want to or not this particular night, or perhaps it was only last night that I didn't want to."

This is an example of both what I liked and didn't about the book. It's an interesting perspective and casts a good deal of light on Juan's uncertainty about the married state, but the style drives me up the wall even though it's one of the least waffly passages in the book.

In terms of substance, the book is pretty much plot free. There are several set-piece scenes, some of which are very well done and give an air of menace or perhaps impending doom, and illuminate Marías' themes. But nothing much actually happens. And I must admit that by the time we finally got to the stage of discovering the reason for Teresa's death, the thing had been so stretched out and the themes beaten into the reader's head so often, that I couldn't imagine anyone actually being surprised by it.

I'm sighing with frustration because there's a lot of good stuff in here. Written in normal prose, it would have made an excellent, thought-provoking novella or short novel. As it is, it's overlong, repetitive and filled with unnecessary waffle, all of which diminishes rather than adding to its impact. I found I could only read it in short sessions because the style frankly bored me into a dwam, and I would discover I'd read several pages (approximately half a paragraph) without absorbing any of it. So, recommended to people who enjoy stream of consciousness writing and not recommended to people who don't. 3½ stars for me, so rounded up.
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on 22 May 2015
A bit difficult for me to read. Very good spanish writer.
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on 14 June 2017
Interesting plot and good narrative. Very convoluted turn of phrase. Suitable for language game lovers
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on 2 July 2015
Well written but found the story a bit disappointing.
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on 20 February 2017
A good read, though not sure it warrants quite all the fuss over it - I quite enjoyed it.
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on 31 December 2016
Worth getting top marks
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on 9 November 2013
I found it such hard work that I gave up....incredibly long, multi-clause sentences that lost me. I realise this is me rather than the author but I felt totally uninvolved on every level. pity
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on 18 September 2013
I found the style impenetrable and thebtrope of long, self-contradictory sentences wearing and difficult to cut through. Gave up on the book.
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on 6 June 2016
If the system had allowed, I would have given the novel a nil stars! Tedious, pretentious, sleazy, foul language and barely any story whatsoever. The worst book that I have read in many years.
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on 12 December 2015
Personally I had it for 5 years and haven't been able to read it
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