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Customer reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5

on 25 October 2012
Sergeant Hoke Mosely works in the busy Miami homicide department. Life's not easy at work, but things soon become more difficult when his two teenage daughters turn up looking for a place to live. Add to this a newly pregnant partner and a stack of 50 cold cases to solve and you would not be surprised is Mosely decided to buy the farm (shoot himself!) Can Mosely juggle all his commitments whilst trying to investigate the apparent OD of a heroin addict?

Written in 1985, 'A New Hope for the Dead' is an incredibly dated book, but that's what gives it its charm. Mosely is a fantastic central character will his no nonsense attitude. Rather than be sensitive Mosely says it straight and it leads to an effective police manner, but also unintentionally funny. I felt that Willeford has written a very dark comedy thriller, with the observations and little asides being amusing, yet not distracting. It was a peculiar book that had old fashioned values, but it was certainly an entertaining read. I look forward to following Sergeant Mosely on other misadventures in the future.
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on 19 October 2007
Sergeant Hoke Mosely works in the busy Miami homicide department. Life's not easy at work, but things soon become more difficult when his two teenage daughters turn up looking for a place to live. Add to this a newly pregnant partner and a stack of 50 cold cases to solve and you would not be surprised is Mosely decided to buy the farm (shoot himself!) Can Mosely juggle all his commitments whilst trying to investigate the apparent OD of a heroin addict?

Written in 1985, 'A New Hope for the Dead' is an incredibly dated book, but that's what gives it its charm. Mosely is a fantastic central character will his no nonsense attitude. Rather than be sensitive Mosely says it straight and it leads to an effective police manner, but also unintentionally funny. I felt that Willeford has written a very dark comedy thriller, with the observations and little asides being amusing, yet not distracting. It was a peculiar book that had old fashioned values, but it was certainly an entertaining read. I look forward to following Sergeant Mosely on other misadventures in the future.
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VINE VOICEon 21 August 2002
I read a lot of good detective fiction and Hoke Moseley blows most modern police characters out of the water. Possibly the least glamorous hero you could imagine (remember the old Frank Cannon series on TV - a bit like that, Jeff Bridges might play the role, NOT Harrison Ford) but definitely the most likeable and down to earth. As well as solving crime with a dedication amazing to behold he has a mountain of family problems to solve with two teenage daughters dumped in his care and a pregnant assistant from an ethnic minority. The dialogue is so funny - not wise cracks - but genuine humour which arises out of the fraught situations and embarassing corners Hoke gets himself into. While you have great fun laughing at his exploits, by the end of the book you've got to admit that he's also an excellent policeman and a lovely guy. Track down the other books in the series - especially Miami Blues and then hunt out Shark Infested Custard by the same author, which is also a scream.
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on 5 August 2013
When I look back at the detective fiction I've enjoyed the most, this one, the second of a series of four featuring Sgt. Hoke, and it's two sequels, stands out as one of the most enjoyable. If the first in the series, Miami Blues, was simply too dark, being told from the point of view of a psychopath, this one finally brings Hoke to the fore as a man taking on new responsibilities for his two teenage daughters, pulling his life together as a consequence, which includes shrugging off his former incipient racism, and generally, blundering along but getting it together. There is also some great humour along the way. He solves crimes of course, but it's heartwarming to see him already in middle age still capable of maturing as a person, which he continues to do in the following two, Sideswipe and tumultuous conclusion, The Way We Die Now.
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on 5 October 2012
If you enjoy crime fiction and have never read Willeford you are missing out on one of the finest writers of this type of fiction. I would recommend any of his books, but this is a good place to start. Similar in a lot of ways to Elmore Leonard in that he writes about violence with some humour. Hoke Moseley is a wonderful character and appears in a few other books, which you will want to buy after reading this book.
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