Learn more Download now Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle The Grand Tour Prize Draw Learn more Shop Women's Shop Men's



on 8 September 2017
Having got this book and started reading it, I found the style was not what I was expecting - it is very simple and prosaic. After some brief research I realised that book (completely black/white cover with wolf head) is not the story as written by Conan Doyle but a retelling of it by some unnamed writer. To be honest, I stopped reading after one page, but I guess that if you want to rattle through the plot without having to deal with old-fashioned language it has some purpose, but I wanted to read a classic so it was useless for me. To be fair, I requested a refund and got it instantly without having to return the item, so the upshot is that I now have a free book I don't want. But I'd rather have paid and had the thing I wanted in the first place.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 April 2016
I can well imagine how it must have been to read Sherlock Holmes when first published and be impressed by his novel, deductive methods. In the light of our exposure to so many TV series that make us all think we could walk into a crime scene, pull on our disposable plastic gloves and figure out who dun it, motive, method, opportunity, it all felt a bit pedestrian. Sorry, Sir Arthur, I really did want to be more impressed.
It was interesting to have spring to mind scenes from films and TV, old and new, and how the enigmatic (or is it ASD?) Holmes was portrayed.
I must have read most of the Holmes stories as a teenager (in the 60s!!) and recall that they were real page-turners and plot twisters to me then. Ah!! the loss of innocence.
11 Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 7 February 2011
Fans of Sherlock Holmes know this story inside and out. I believe most followers of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's work would rate this as his finest, as I most cetrainly do. Clive Merrison plays fictions most famous detective and Michael Williams his trusty side kick.

Instead of a brief outline of the story, which most will know, let me give you my humble opinion of this recording. The great thing about BBC plays for radio is the background! A wonderful atmosphere, that is so 'alive', helps to bring the best out of the two aforementioned actors. Merrison plays 'Holmes' with an edge; mocking his friend Watson and his incorrect deduction's and then emploring him as to the seriousness of the situation. Even the interlude of the violin between scenes touches Holmes' angst...

Jeremy Brett and Edward Hardwicke were Holmes and Watson personified for the screen. Clive Merrison, and his very able companion Michael williams, may hold this same accolade for radio.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 22 May 2013
Perhaps a central attraction of The Hound of The Baskervilles is that one mystery in the plot breeds another almost ad infinitum. Dr Mortimer believes that Sir Charles Baskerville's death is due to the curse of the Baskervilles by which successive heirs to its legacy have been snuffed out in untimely fashion across the centuries since the time of Cromwell when after an avenging spirit wants to settle a score after the early Sir Hugo Baskerville's lifestyle and deeds had blackened the family's name.
There is an attempt to reinforce the plausibility of the curse in the suggestion that when it is found that Sir Charles' body shows no sign of violence to it, the only possible explanation of his untimely death may be that he died of fright after witnessing the notorious hound, reputed by some to be a beast inhabited by a demon.
The plot clearly demands a willing suspension of disbelief and though it is a little difficult to take it seriously, there is just enough in the so-called myth of the beast to put events into the realm of possibility.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 15 September 2017
Fascinating case which demonstrates Conan Doyle at his best. The gripping plot with excellent development of character shows how Sherlock Holmes unwinds the complex reality behind simplistic superstition
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 15 May 2017
Well put together, the longest running Sherlock with Clive Merison. Good production values, well put together and makes a great radio drama
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 25 May 2017
A good read one I have not visited for some time and glad I did to value it's content . Nice one Sherlock
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 29 June 2017
Another excellent read.. the stories really give depth and detail to the films I've seen on these books before..
a must read for any Sherlock fans of any age
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 28 January 2016
A little drawn out
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 22 February 2010
Of all the many Holmes adaptations there have been, the Merrison/Williams radio versions are way ahead of the pack. They recorded the whole Holmes canon, and the final episodes were the two parts of The Hound Of the Baskervilles. Merrison's Holmes is a joy. Energetic, quicksilver and flawed, never dull and always surprising. Williams, a master of radio drama, makes Watson (actually a far harder part) his own. The stories are given breathing space, yet never drag. Brilliant. Love them. Buy them.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse