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on 6 July 2009
Great, enchanting, keeps you wanting more! All of Galsworthy's stories about the Forsyte Family are like this.
I read these books when I was about eighteen in 1962 and was taken back to them when the BBC did the first Forsyte Saga series with Eric Porter as Soames and Nyree Dawn Porter as Irene, in late 60's early 70's. This was an excellent adaptation - the later one, made in about 2002,is awful (see my review on this). Nyree Dawn Porter will always be Irene to me, as Eric Porter will always be Soames in the old TV version.
These stories are not 'dated' as you might expect, as the intrigue, love, passion and greed are there just as much as in any racey novel of today, albeit, perhaps not in so many words..., nevertheless it is so well written that you get the gist just the same.
The scope of these stories is immense, taking in the Forsytes, their many relations, friends and acquaintances, all living, breathing, fighting and loving in these wonderful books.

The later books go on long past Soames, Irene et al, but are still just a well written and absorbing.
Do read them, if you can - when I bought them in about 1964 they were in three volumes and are now available as seperate books and in an omnibus edition, I believe. They are well worth whatever you pay, believe me and I know you will love them as much as I do.
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on 14 October 2012
This second trilogy is much less familiar than the twice-televised first. Following the First World War Galsworthy's City tribe mix with the lesse aristocracy, and public affairs start to intrude on their world of law and property as never before. Galsworthy seems to have started to dress young in an attempt to conceal hs age, and is less comfortable than he was when chronicling the Victorian age. The death of Soames, which signals the end of the saga, is clumsily melodramatic. Don't think of reading ese three novels if yo have not first read their predecessors.
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on 4 December 2010
If you thought the Saga of the Forsytes stopped where the TV series did, you are in for a lovely surprise. Here are 3 further books of what happened to Fleur and Soames next. Brilliantly written, with lots of stream of consciousness musings from the older Soames, who is now a sympathetic figure in the way he was not when Irene was around (she does not directly appear in these books), we move on in the 2oth Century, with lots of witty observations on life and events of its early years. It is a wonderful read, and I shall have to get the next 3 books, Forsyte Saga 3.
The only reason I did not give this 5 stars was the actual printing of this edition has typos and is not great, but the quality of the writing is 5 star.
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on 30 January 2003
It's easy to be put off by the sheer weight of the Forsyte tomes (there are three volumes in all, the first of which stretches to over 900 pages), but it should be noted that each volume contains three separate stories.
Each of these stories focuses on two or three members of the Forsyte family and has as its backdrop a particular period in time, the social and cultural aspects of which are an integral part of Galsworthy's narrative. For instance, in the first volume, Soames Forsyte's marriage to Irene Heron is set against the prevalent attitudes of late nineteenth and early twentieth century society towards marriage, divorce, property rights, and the emancipation of women. All this makes for a rich tapestry of plot, character, and sociological history.
The one and only criticism I have is that Galsworthy is often overly sentimental in terms of both style and plot, sometimes bordering on the mawkish.
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on 26 August 2014
This is a wonderful book, but I am very disappointed by the huge number of typos in the Kindle edition. You don't mind this so much when the book has been converted to the digital format by volunteers and is free, but it is unsatisfactory when you have paid for the Kindle edition.
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on 6 May 2016
As expected. Sometimes one just wants actual print in hand with a family tree at the beginning.
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on 28 January 2015
The White Monkey is a worthy modern successor to The Forstye Saga Vol. 1.
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on 17 October 2014
A good account of interwar social history.
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on 16 November 2014
One of my all time faves!
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on 26 July 2015
very good
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