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Customer reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
63
4.0 out of 5 stars
A Handful of Dust (Penguin Modern Classics)
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on 9 August 2014
I have avoided this author since a child due to watching a little of Brideshead Revisited at an early age and finding it boring (too young to appreciate it). This book however is easy to follow, full of dialogue and a joy to read. The alternative ending is bizare to say the least, but the original conclusion is a logical end to the book. i now want to read more of his work and may actually look for Brideshead Revisited.
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on 12 May 2017
All good. I knew the book anyway but this is a nice edition.
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on 19 July 2017
I'm very pleased with my purchase.
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on 17 August 2017
very interesting story
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on 10 October 2017
Captivating
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on 4 August 2014
I AM READING THIS BOOK BECAUSE IT IS MY GRANDDAUGHTERS A LEVEL BOOK IT WAS INTERESTING BUT I FOUND THE LAST HALF RUSHED
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICEon 14 March 2016
I picked this up off a (very dusty) shelf a couple of weeks ago, dimly recalling the plot from the 1988 film adaption. It's a tale of betrayal, delusion, disappointment and decadence, in which actions and situations are described in a neutral tone that gives the story a satirical air, with serious undercurrents. The dialogue gives an exact impression of the time in which it was set: people say things like "But look here, my dear fellow", "Splendid. I *am* glad. It's beastly going up at this time, particularly by that train", and "It's not only that. I think it's hard cheese on Tony". (The reliance on dialogue to move the story along is heightened by the - then - novel use of telephone conversations.) And just when you think that the story of the infidelity of Lady Brenda and the cynicism of society is proceeding along depressingly predictable lines, the story takes a sharp turn about two-thirds of the way through and heads off into a different world, with very surprising results. It's an engrossing tale which doesn't take long to read, and, whilst it might prove too dark for some readers, is an enjoyable piece of work.
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on 28 July 2011
For those who enjoy Waugh, this uniform edition of his works is welcome. Many of his titles have been out of print, hard to find, and available only in expensive older editions or rag-tag paperbacks. By the end of 2011, a couple of dozen oorf his titles will have appeared in this format. Now if some one would only do the same for Graham Greene.
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on 1 November 2016
I am just reading this for our book club.and it is the first Evelyn Waugh I have read and is not filling me with enthusiasm. I know many people are great fans so probably we will be reading others so I have to refer my judgement.
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on 18 August 2017
I'll not mix in the fruitless discussion whether this is or is not Waugh's best book. There is no accounting for tastes and preferences. But, apart from Brideshead Revisited, I have not read any of Waugh's books (or many other ones) with as much pleasure as this one. My first copy dates from my undergraduate days in the early eighties and has been read to pieces and is now living out its well deserved final years in my cupboard, after a life well spent on countless holidays. So it is this edition which has finally replaced the book and will be my companion for the coming years. What it is that grabs me is difficult to explain, but it is a mix of the absurd, the ironic detachment, the terrific dialogue (the exchange between Tony and Reggie about the divorce settlements is surely one of the greatest accomplishments in 20th century literature, with Jock and Tony drunk in London hard on its heels), the wicked, even cruel wit, and the too-horrible-to-contemplate, nightmarish ending (avoid the alternative ending). Why should the most likable character (if there is one, that is (Jock Grant-Menzies, John Andrew?) but for the sake of the argument let's make that Tony) get his happy ending? I think it a stroke of (however perverse) genius that it is Tony who suffers the worst fate of all, completely undeserved. But that's life, isn't it? Those who know their Elliot might have guessed from the title (or looked it up) that the book would not end well....
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