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First book I've read in ages that I've felt inclined to not put down
I would definitely recommend this book to anyone
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on 10 January 2016
as described
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on 10 June 2013
I have in the past reviewed an Amazon purchase, and I might, occasionally and if I feel strongly, be tempted to write another.

In the meantime I will copy this comment onto a few of my 126 unreviewed purchases. But until this "required" review is made optional, I am very unlikely to complete one again, and you will not get what I am prepared to complete, namely my one to five stars rating.
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on 29 May 2015
Great book in good condition
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on 24 April 2015
All as described
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on 4 December 2009
Love in the turn of the century Caribbean. Marquez transports us to a world of hammocks and parrots, before taking us back in time, to the centre of the hot, sweltering city and love forming and growing from youth.

It is the story of Florentina Ariza, the child without a father who sights Fermina Daza through a window down a decorative alley and falls in love with her forever. They woo each other with a childish infatuation, feeling love at its most sentimental, expressing it in poetic letters and music, with an ethereal transcendence drawn from the optimistic belief of youth. It is here that the novel, and Marquez are at their best - celebrating the magic of young love, juxtaposed with the tropical, whimsical Caribbean background, giving it all a utopian feeling, which is everything that adolescent mind strives for, and believes it can find.

A trip on the river, through the barren fields and marshes away from the city - a liminality in an area of the world full of quickly contracting cultures and identities - changes Daza's opinions forever. It is the backdrop of Cholera, growing and spreading amongst the rural lands that steals love away from her forever, makes her realize the reality of the world, that love isn't always the answer, that there is always tragedy lying behind. It brings her back to the city a different person - material, pragmatic - and leads to her romance with Dr Urbino. It is a doctor, the curer of disease, that she looks to. A healer of the darkness of love and tragedy.

We then see the different sides of how humans change and become their different selves - selves who they feel the world demands of them - how they form existences away from love, and yet determined by love all the same.

Ariza becomes a serial womanizer of widows, who can understand his feelings of loss, of existing beyond love through sex - obsessive sex, sex that never satisfies, but is enough.

All the while Daza exists, in a world of wealth, travel, romance and manners, where she is domesticated but unhappy. It is the two polarities of escaping love and truth - the façade and the introspection.

Perhaps it is in her own repressed infidelity that is the cause of her husband's affair - there are some conditions that he cannot heal.
Perhaps it is also through age that we realize what we truly need, and he could cheat himself no longer.

Finally Ariza and Daza are able to join together at the age where the youthful sense of reckless frivolity returns - there is no responsibility anymore - and impending death means that they feel immortal. Together they return to the river, back to the region of poverty and death, where cholera is rife and where Daza left her feelings long ago. The raising of the cholera flag represents the journey back to freedom, freedom from their feelings, away from a society built to repel disease and repel truth at the same time, the two of which still lie dormant amongst the natural beauty of the Caribbean.
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on 27 December 2006
This is a beautifully written tale of love and longing, of destiny and enduring hope. The novel takes the reader on an epic journey, following the destinies of the 2 main protagonists, that diverge and then converge as the story unfolds. This novel has been written with such warmth and humour that the hopes and fears of the characters become your own. The true worth of this book lies in the passion with which it was obviously written and the sheer beauty of its prose.
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on 16 January 2017
another great book from gabriel i enjoy all hi books
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on 8 July 2016
This is the second time I have tried to read this. The writing is amusing and rich in places but the plot is not a page turner. I believe its what's caolled magical realism which is far too high brow for me. I'm happy for people who enjoy it but its aheavy read.
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on 8 July 2010
Having read "100 Years of Solitude" I immediately set about reading the other books by Marquez. When I started "Love in the time of cholera" i was immediately sucked in to the narrative. Everything is described in so much detail that you feel you are actually witnessing these events. Quite different to his other books and probably the most accessible (depending how much or little you enjoy the magical realism of his other novels).
I found myself rationing myself to reading in short bursts so as not to finish it too quickly, such was the enjoyment. I cannot recommend this book too highly - in my opinion it is quite simply the best I have ever read and this comes from a middle-aged, cynical, grumpy old man!
I am currently reading it again for the umpteenth time - at each reading it only seems to get better
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