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Customer reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
18
4.2 out of 5 stars


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on 12 April 2013
VEry readable book that takes you through the history of geometry with some interesting facts and insight. Leonard Mlodinow yet again shows how he can take challenging mathematical concepts and make them simple to understand whilst giving great anecdotes and insights
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on 6 August 2013
I completed another of Mlodinow's book, about probability and it was fantastic. This one has started the same and I've heard more about this book, so far so good.
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on 23 June 2016
This is a fantastic book full of great stories.
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on 9 May 2016
Very entertaining.
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on 14 May 2001
This book is insightful and elegent, having read it once I just had to buy it...
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on 13 August 2010
I'm writing this review from Work. It's Friday afternoon and I'm a bit bored. You know how it is when you become proficient at your job, things that used to excite you just wind you up. Your mind starts playing tricks and things that you find funny just make you appear silly. Well that's my take on this book. It's ok but I get the feeling its full of injokes for those that have a phd in maths or physics. Kind of like a private joke that the lay people can't join in with because there too busy scratching their heads trying to understand the poorly explained last paragraph. By the time it got to Einstein and Relativity I had to put it down and order something else to help me.

The theme that runs throughout the book is that any examples are explained using the author's kids, which quite frankly makes me want to.....aaargh!
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on 15 October 2014
A1
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on 12 September 2010
This book is written by a narcissistic author who thinks he can explain the history of geometry ("from parallel lines to hyperspace") in a reader friendly way, but sadly fails in this attempt. Already on the first page of his introduction, he has it wrong by writing "That the masts and sails vanish first, Aristotle saw in a flash of genius, is a sign that the earth is curved". Must be "that the hull vanishes first", of course ... Moreover, the author repeatedly brings his own children Alexei and Nicolai onto the stage in a vain attempt to explain difficult theories, adding only more confusion in the mind of the reader. Whereas "string theory" is concerned, after reading this book I still don't have a clue what it is (and yet my IQ is 140 ...).
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