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on 1 September 2017
Aristotle's Politics is a masterpiece, he starts off talking about how a city (polis) is a compound, with the parts or elements consisting of the household, the village and then the city. A city is a political association or 'sharing', with the end goal of the city being the good life or having the leisure time to engage in politics. Not all people can attain the good life, in order for some people to attain it, some people have to do the menial or degrading tasks, such as slaves, mechanics and manual labourers. He describes how household management consists of the master-slave, husband-wife, or father-children relationships, which correspond to how rulers of the city relate to their subjects. Aristotle discusses constitutions at length, which is how the various political offices of a city are organised. Constitutions are grouped in to two corresponding groups of right and perverted: kingship, aristocracy and 'constitutional government' against tyranny, oligarchy and democracy. Although oligarchy and democracy are classified as perverted constitutions, these are the constitutions Aristotle spends most of the book talking about. He then discusses how the various constitutions are destroyed through factional fighting and how they are best preserved. Aristotle explores every possibility or combination in order I suspect to avoid criticism; he leaves no stone unturned. He then goes on to describe how children should be educated by the city and not privately, in reading and writing, drawing, gymnastics and music. The last chapter is devoted to music education. The work is deep and technical, it's amazing how advanced the Greek philosophers were in the 4th century BC, as compared to the not so much earlier biblical writers of Israel. The analysis of the politics of the city (polis) is a universal example or analogy of the workings of any modern state. One really gains confidence in statecraft and politics, even when applied to large modern states. The translators notes are also imperative. I highly recommend this book to anyone!
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on 27 August 2017
This is a good edition of one of the most important books ever written
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on 18 July 2017
The book has about 100 pages although the font is slightly smaller than normal (the letter e is about 1 mm in height whistle larger letters such as p and h are about 2mm).
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on 10 December 2016
Very interesting and opens your mind
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on 14 January 2016
Yes
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on 22 October 2016
Great book, quick delivery, many thanks
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on 12 January 2016
excellent
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on 5 December 2015
Satisfied
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on 30 October 2017
Letters to small but content very good quality
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on 5 February 2016
great value. great service,
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