Learn more Download now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Learn more Shop now Learn more



on 2 December 2015
Young Lord Colambre sees that Lady Clonbrony, his mother's attempts to get into London society are being ridiculed behind her back, and putting his father ever deeper into debt. He travels to Dublin then incognito onto his father's Irish estates which are being run by agents on behalf of the absentee landlord. The first estate he visits is well run by a kindly agent, but the second and largest is in ruin, in the hands of an unscrupulous villain who thinks nothing of putting the tenants' rent up so high they can't pay and are made homeless. Colambre returns home to persuade his parents to return to Ireland which he eventually manages to do, but not without the side plot of finding out that his supposed illegitimate cousin Grace Nugent, whom he loves, but convention won't allow him to marry, is in fact an heiress, legitimate and therefore perfectly acceptable. Written in 1812, Maria Edgeworth tells of the hardships endured by the Irish due to the absentee landlords who seem to care nothing for their estates apart from the money made from them. Very much of its time, it is a heartwarming story. Compared to her other novel on this subject. Castle Rackrent, it is a much more readable and enjoyable tale.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 18 April 2013
This is Maria Edgeworth's other volume beside Castle Rackrent dealing with tenant and landlord relations in Ireland around 1800. Her father owned an estate and his daughter helped him to manage it. Both were concerned with what they regarded as the problems caused by absentee landlords. She was making a point that all landlords should reside on their estates and get to know their tenants personally. Many absentee landlords, then as now, were institutions like endowed colleges, charitable institutions and churches, where this would not be possible. Other landlord argued that a good estate manager who knew his business was better than a resident landlord who did not. Anyway, Miss Edgeworth was arguing her case.
As a novelist she was a contemporary of Jane Austen and like her commented on people's foibles. Definitely a book to buy
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 31 December 2016
Good
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 8 January 2017
The Penguin Classics is a good scholarly edition of this e-book, with useful notes and extra material, but it has a few spelling mistakes and inconsistencies with the print edition.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 20 August 2013
Started a little slowly. Never heard of author before but ended up with it a really enjoyable read. Well worth a read.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 15 June 2015
This edition is truly dreadful-the layout is awful, there are no page numbers and the text isn't justified.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 11 October 2004
Maria Edgeworth in this novel points satirically at wealthy ladies who aspire to gain a foothold in London society. The means to their social advancement is through interior decor of a very exotic sort!
The style of writing is very pointed,and Edgeworth's voice can be heard behind the witty words. The novel has a meaning today ,with so much interest shown in interior and exterior design as a result of television programmes.
0Comment| 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse