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on 1 June 2010
If you have little prior knowledge of George or his reign, this book is an excellent introduction. The book concentrates on George's personality and his personal relationships with his family and ministers rather than in-depth analysis of the events of his reign. George is one of the most tragic figures in our history and Christopher Hibbert presents his portrait with great sensitivity and warmth.
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on 8 November 2014
Exactly what I needed and at an exceptional price too. This product arrived promptly and in excellent condition and what's more it is easy to read. I would happily shop from this company again.
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on 18 May 2015
very good
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on 2 October 2014
Fine thaks
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on 7 January 2015
Excellent
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on 25 May 2010
I knew very little about George III before I bought this book - limited mostly to Nigel Hawthorne's sympathetic portrayal in the Madness of King George and his supposed interest in farming and agriculture.

I now know some more about the man, his background and the politics of the time. But, for a 400 page book, I don't feel as though I have come away with as much as I had hoped. There is a lot about the continuing change in the government and his seemingly life-long battle with Pitt the Elder and Charles Fox (their life, not his as he outlived them both), some information about the American War of Independence and the Napoleonic wars and a little about his infamous madness.

However, for me the book seemed to struggle, there was not enough information about the wars or government policy which brought about his intense dislike of certain politicians and the seemingly continual change in government. Or, maybe it was merely a reflection of George himself, and that his likes and dislikes were not about the politics, just the men, I am not sure.

I know that it is usually a novelist's preserve to make you feel strongly about the central character, but I also would like to feel something for the subject of a biography, and, I didn't. I finished reading this unsure if I wanted to read any more about George or the period in case I had missed something, or whether that was all there was. I didn't really care about George III, I am not sure whether I liked or disliked him, which is a shame, because I wanted to.

Whilst I will agree that the book was well researched, and, I could not in truth call it boring, neither could I say it was particularly fascinating either. It is a potentially interesting book that has perhaps concentrated in the wrong areas, whilst not a difficult read, it made it seem like a never-ending read.
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on 26 July 2006
Before I read this book I had the opinion that most people have that George III was

a) mad

b) lost our American Colonies and was generally another Royal waste of space.

He emerges in this book as a fine and sensitive person who did his very best for his country. He tried endlessly to stamp out corruption and waste both within and outside his family. The suffering he endured due to his inherited 'madness' is difficult to imagine but he recovered from it and became a much loved and appreciated King unlike his wife who died bitter and unloved. His breakdowns were precipitated by big events such as losing the American Colonies and the threat of war with Napoleon.
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on 2 October 2001
As usual Hibbert gives the reader a view of his subject which is always readable and never dull. By virtue of thorough research and plenty of anecdotes we get a picture of a king as a father and a husband who also wore the crown of England for an exceptionally long period. Hibbert is also remarkably good at setting the scene in particular the turbulent times of the late 18th century and the changes taking place in the world both in society and in politics. We see a king coping with the rebellions in the American colonies and developments in parliamentary power. Finally we see a man and his family who have to deal with his"madness" which leads to his retreat from society. Hibbert manages to infuse this biography with warmth and compassion for the man rather than the king.
A superb book to begin with understanding English history in the 18th/19th century.
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on 26 April 1999
Hibbert is one of our most readable biographers and his latest book is no exception. Hibbert's meticulous research into this much maligned and mis-understood Monarch is impressive and his story brings the Hanoverian period to life in all it's colour, pomp, peculiarities and excitement.
George III is generally only know for two things; losing America and going mad. Hibbert, however, deals with all facets of George III's life; political, personal and regal and a fascinating picture emerges of a King devoted to his Country and his subjects and whose sole ambition was to be a good King. This biography is an excellent account of a most interesting period in our Country's history.
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on 7 December 2013
This book is written by a third party view who had digested a selected written resources about George III. The author called it a personal history not because is written by the George himself. The author had read a selected number of books and articles and complied a story about George III. In this sense it had become his view of the King. The limitation of the author and his lack of knowledge in other areas that George had been involved made the book a narrow and one dimensional history . King George III was a multi- talented man. He had a great interest in Science and agriculture and literature and music etc which were either ignored or mentioned casually in the book. Where the book is good are gossips, social interaction and pure history of the time.
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