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4.2 out of 5 stars
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4.2 out of 5 stars
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on 20 February 2012
This article was originally a newspaper article written by 2 journalists who were intrigued by the case of the murder of The Earl of Erroll in Kenya in the 40's it was never solved and highlighted the lifestyle of rich ex-pats living in Kenya while the rest of England struggled. The Earl of Erroll was a womanizer and had many affairs he was in the middle of an affair with the wife of Jock Broughton when he was murdered. Jock was accused but acquitted, the trial and evidence was a bit of a farce and no one was ever tried for his murder, although rumours of letters, found murder weapons, ex-girlfriends and assassination by British Agents all persist, but no hard evidence has ever been found. The book comes down on the side Jock Broughton being the murderer and he was supposed to have confessed to a couple of people. The difficulty was in 1969 when the article started many of the main characters had passed away and with them all the secrets. James Fox and Cyril Connelly left no stone unturned and tried to meet everyone connected with the case. He visited Kenya again in the late 70's early 80's and managed to get an interview with Diana Broughton ( Errolls mistress) she had rose through a series of marriages to become one of the most powerful and rich white women in Kenya at this time. She did not throw any light on the murder but was an interesting character. She died in 1987 and now all the people connected with this strange case have long passed away we will never know the truth and it will remain a mystery of our time.
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on 20 August 2017
A well researched attempt to solve the murder of Joss Errol, the lothario of the Happy Valley set but ultimately the questions will always remain since so many people had reasons to do the deed. It certainly opens ones eyes as to how the privileged classes in Kenya passed their time in the absence of anything worthwhile to do. One wonders what the indigenous population, forced to be their 'houseboys' really thought about this louche group of individuals. One thing is certain they displayed more discretion and dignity than the people for whom they were working. An eye opener and a jolly good read but very difficult to have much sympathy for either the victim or possible culprits.
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on 18 September 2017
Whatever did they get up to? enjoyed
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on 18 June 2017
|Great story
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on 4 July 2017
still one of the best true crime books i have read and reread.
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on 17 January 1999
I found this book of particular interest since I lived in Kenya briefly, and am familiar with many of the locations mentioned. Even for those who have never been to Africa, this book is a definite page turner, especially since it is fact, not fiction.
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on 21 April 2017
Excellent.
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on 31 December 2014
I read this a while ago now but you couldn't put it down. Really hooked & you certainly wanted to know Who Done It? Totally gripping. I've also read The Langhorne Sisters. Delves Broughton is a friend of my sister's.
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on 25 June 2001
Fox's account of the decadent life and premature death of Josslyn Hay, Lord Erroll, makes fascinating reading, particularly if one has an interest in colonial Africa. While not necessarily the most flowing account of a complicated situation, it shed useful light on the mystery of Lord Erroll's death. Anyone who is interested in the case should also read "The Life and Death of Lord Erroll" by Errol Trzebinski, which puts a completely new spin on the mystery and contradicts the conclusions reached by Fox.
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on 10 September 2003
This book is an absolute eye-opener for those who are keen on learning more about colonial Africa. To read how the upper class settlers behaved and lived some 60 years ago is definitely stunning in it's vulgarity. This you do not usually read about! But wait, there's even more: it's also a first class detective story. Not the usual John Grisham kind, but factional. Deep investigative work. Autobiographical. I'll gladly admit I read it all in one weekend and enjoyed myself thoroughly. Buy it!
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