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on 8 September 2017
This is one of my favourite books but I was disappointed that the cover of the book that I received was not the same as in the picture.
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on 16 August 2017
Could not get into it
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on 10 September 2007
This is msot definitly a book to make you think. Though it is blessed with Winterson's always spectacular writing, the style is very different. If you are looking for a basic structured novel simple telling a story, then this is not for you.
Sexing The Cherry is an unusual book, filled with numerous little tales that all add to the brilliance of the book.
Interesting characters, fantastic writing, and ideas to play on your mind, this book is truely unique.
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on 3 December 2014
Great book, love the very abstract feel of the story although it can be a little confusing at times. Would recommend it for a short trip, and the length is short and sweet but gives the reader much food for thought.
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on 4 May 2017
Imaginative and great story telling
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on 26 June 2012
Sexing The Cherry is just one of those books you probably have to read twice to start appreciating its style. Somewhat similar to Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit, Sexing the Cherry often engages with controversial material, but manages to make it its strenght.
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on 23 January 2014
Very good to study. Not always easy to understand. Once i understand the book was about time travel that helped.
Needed to read and study it as part of my course.
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on 27 August 2017
"In the city the inhabitants have reconciled two discordant desires: to remain in one place and to leave it behind forever."
I was first introduced to Winterson when I was at university: it was my first year, and we were studying 'Written on the body'; since then, I've been a little bit in love with the way that she displays her characters, the way that she explores cities and places, and the way that she manages to put you right at home amongst characters on massive, life changing journeys.
This journey, then, is shared with Jordan and his mother: Jordan, found in bundles by the river: his mother, a giant capable of both brutal murders and unending love. Their story begins, of course, with Jordan being found and named after a moving body of water (something that his mother later regrets, contributing his personality to his name); but really, I think their story begins with the banana, and ends with the Great Fire.
The story is cleverly told from both their perspectives, and therefore gives insight into both of their struggles: the mother, who wants her son to remain with her, to love her in the same way that she loves him, and a son, who wants to travel, to explore, to find.
Jordan is obsessed with finding a mysterious dancer; a woman he has only ever seen at an unusual dinner party: he observes her fleeing from an open window, cutting and retying her rope before she falls. He becomes infatuated, and his adventures become centred around finding her. Only, when he does track her down (after a series of fantastic adventures), he realises he cannot stay with her: his mother is waiting for him at home.
His mother, on the other hand, is having some wild adventures of her own. She becomes part of a group set on finding and punishing the people who were responsible for the death of the King; she carries out several murders and helps to remove the bodies of those who perished from the plague.
And yet, when Jordan returns, she is waiting on the beach for him.
Although the novel is not long, it is jam-packed with unconditional love, fantastic adventures and witty language. It leaves you feeling at home, even when you're travelling the sea with Jordan.
I highly recommend it, even to those who have never read Winterson before.
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on 16 January 2015
Excellent book.
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on 11 January 2000
Jeanette Winterson's "Sexing the Cherry" is a genuinely original novel. A short, incredibly dense collection of interwoven tales that never fail to amuse, amaze and enrich your understanding of the English language. This is Winterson's great gift - her wonderful command of the language which allows her to pull off 'tour de force' linguistic tricks that will leave you begging for more. The main part of the novel concerns the Rabelasian character of a 17th century giant woman in London, but there are frequent asides and passages set in the modern day. This book will change the boundaries of what you previously thought prose writing could convey.
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