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on 4 February 2014
I have enjoyed reading tudor books for a while now and really like Alison Weirs informative accounts. Very easy to read.
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on 7 March 2017
Quite good.
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on 5 October 2017
Still reading it
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on 13 August 2017
Not as good as all the other books written by same author
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on 23 August 1999
This book gives in depth factual information that quenches my thirst for Tudor information. Although the book covers Jane Grey, Edward VI, Elizabeth, and Mary I well, Alison has failed to mention Henry VIII bastard son, Henry Frizroy, the son of one of Henry's mistresses, Elizabeth Blount. Although Frizroy played no part in England's political history, it would have been nice to have some information on him. Other then that, this book is probably one of Alison's best, showing both the personal and political sides to each person. Keep writing!
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on 26 October 1997
If you'd like to gain a better appreciation for the necessity of separating church and state, or for the orderly change of governments (for the most part) today, check this book out. Ms. Weir does a great job of putting together history books that communicate the intrigues and difficulties of British politics in the 15th and 16th centuries. I can't wait to see her book about Elizabeth I; this one ends just as Elizabeth gains the throne of England. I learned so much about the short lives of Edward and Lady Jane Grey, and the politics of marriage, through Weir's books. "The Princes in the Tower" and "Six Wives of Henry VIII" are also terrific reads.
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on 14 January 2001
I thought this would be just another book about the Tudors - but it casts new light on the Tudors and gives insight into the later actions of both Mary and Elizabeth. An excellent read.
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on 18 April 2000
A fascinating book that deals with each of his children in turn. It gives the reader an insight into why they acted as they did. It proves that really all four of them were neglected lonely people. I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it to anyone interested in this period.
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on 6 April 2003
I had previously found the Tudor age rather complicated and a little vague due to the complexed nature of Henry VIII's numerous wives and children.I started to read this book and became absorbed in the intrigue of this period of Tudor England. It provides in depth details of Henry's children and the profound effect their individual lives would have on the political and social developments of the Kingdoms they ruled, be it long or short. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in the Tudor period and which leads to arguably the greatest sovereign in Elizabeth I that this country has seen.
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on 7 May 2009
This book is also published under the title The Children of Henry VIII, so don't be caught out as I was, thinking they were two separate books. I would recommend buying the book under The Children of Henry VIII title, as the typeface is much larger, clearer and easier to read than under the Children of England title.
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