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on 10 August 2013
I have a scientific background but this is not the most riveting read. It starts very slowly and by then I had lost interest
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on 7 March 2016
Lisa is an excellent communicator. She does a good job of giving you a feel of what is going on in a difficult subject without patronizing the reader. It would be too much to ask for her to provide a solid understanding of quantum chromodynamics and the Higgs mechanism without the use of sophisticated mathematics. Her views on the history and philosophy of science are also of interest.
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on 1 February 2013
It is a little bit outdated in relation with the CERN experiment. The Higgs boson the author hopes to be found in her book is found. And proof of the 4th dimension is very close... She should wait at least one more year before publishing it...
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on 8 March 2014
The best description of CERN I have come across. How did Europe manage to organise it when everything else it to touch seems to turn to dust!
Very comprehensible (well mostly) great book.
MM
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on 22 March 2013
Excellent explanation of modern physics thinking , particularly clarifying the particle "zoo". I recommend it to my students at all levels
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on 30 November 2011
The subtitle of the book (and the brief presentation in The Daily Show) lead me to think that it is about modern day physicist relation to the world. In a way it is, but much less philosophical than I thought. The book is mostly about the discoveries that the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is expected to find. If I didn't knew better I would have regarded Lisa Randall an Euopean scientist: The LHC and the CERN is mentioned so much that it almost looks like an advertisment... The European point of view even go so far that all units in the book is metric (which I prefer).

The book is OK, and Lisa Randall is writing with much enthusiasm. She does know her job, and she can present the physical theories in a way so that a layman have a chance of understanding. Still, I would have preferred that the book folowed its subtitle more - and had less of LHC.
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on 9 July 2014
Bestseller!lisa randall is a rising star on theoretical physics!
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on 29 October 2014
Patronizing, popular science but, in my view, tediously written.
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on 27 September 2011
This is a complicated subject. Transferring modern scientific understanding to a lay audience is no easy task. This excellent book approaches the whole subject from a number of different but well-structured perspectives. The result is not only an excellent read; but also, for me, an essential reference book.
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on 6 February 2013
Does not live up to the review headlines on the cover page. I found the section on the CERN hadron collider interesting but except for that it was a lot of mostly philosofical comments with little substance.
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