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on 27 September 2017
I read this on Kindle and enjoyed it. As you do, though, I couldn’t help wondering - what if? Given Ms Weir’s assessment of Mary’s character, with which I can’t help agreeing, what if she had married a man who could have been a support to her?
We can discount Robert Dudley, because Elizabeth would never have let him go, but what if Lord James had been a second cousin, or an Albert of Saxe-Coburg- Gotha had come along?
Without doubt Albert’s policy would have been to keep on the right side of Elizabeth, for the sake of the children, and he might even have persuaded Mary to turn Protestant. Of course, Albert would have nullified Mary as a threat to Elizabeth, and then Elizabeth might have married Dudley.
Off topic, when you look at the foreign princes Elizabeth gave some consideration to, as distinct from the kings Mary dangled after, Elizabeth was more realistic. She looked at younger sons, and with the exception of Mary of York, (of William and Mary fame) all princesses in direct line for the succession have married younger sons - Queen Anne, Queen Victoria, Princess Charlotte of Wales and Her present Majesty. All the Duke of Edinburgh’s major honours were conferred by George VI.
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on 2 November 2012
Alison Weir's in depth research is evident in the reading of this book. It is not a book for you if you are looking for the romantic tale of the delightful young woman whom history has abused. Mary comes accross as having similar human frailties to ordinary women of today. She made bad decisions and had to live with them. Alison Weir does a good job of helping the reader to understand and remember the very different mores of a time when monarchs were believed to be divine, but were surrounded by sycophants. Despite her excellent research, there is, of course, no easy answer to Mary's level of involvement in Darnley's murder; you can decide for yourself what you believe to be the balance of probabilities.
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on 12 February 2017
I bought this as a follow up to "The Six wives of Henry VIII". It is not nearly as readable. The print is the smallest available and the information too dense. This is more a tome for History students.
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on 4 December 2015
Not as interesting as her other books (all of which I love) I agree with others who said a Who's Who
would be helpful also a Family tree of the main characters.
After reading the book I did not feel as clear as to the facts as in other of her history books.
I feel the main parts of the information got a bit lost in the detail.
However I will continue to read Alison Weir as overall I love her books.
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on 14 October 2017
Interesting read
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on 12 August 2017
good read
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on 1 February 2018
As described
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on 20 March 2014
another brilliant book by Alison weir. she keeps you interested from beginning to end. quite simply, this book tells you all about the life of mary queen of scotts.
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on 13 August 2013
The book progressively reveals a fascinating but turbulent time in history that was built on a web of lies, deceipt & treachery. Well researched & compelling, giving a fresh & seamingly unbiased, very human view of Mary, Queen of Scotts & her struggle to survive in a male dominated, truculent society.
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on 4 July 2014
Very good ,well written . No complaints.
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