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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
140
4.6 out of 5 stars
Format: Paperback|Change
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on 25 February 2010
If you don't know anythig about Iranian culture or history this might be an alternative introduction to a meaty boring treaty. Hilarious, straight-to-the-point, enjoyable, Persepolis doesn't spare nasty deails, either. Everything is filtered through the experience of the author, but some explanations on the wider picture are also provided to the reader. The book is in fact targeted to a Western audience and has some "Iran for dummies" features, so to speak. I would recommend it to anyone, young and adults, men and women. I read it in just two days, because it is literally addictive.
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on 13 October 2011
I am a self-confessed bookworm, but I can safely say I've never read a book like Persepolis. I bought this after watching the film, and being amazed by its humour, and artistic originality. The book has all this and more. Witty, funny and also moving, Marjane Satrapi's clever combination of illustration and text gives a unique "comic book" style. I was worried this wouldn't read like other books, but it does, and the story of the Iranian revolution is brilliantly told through a young girl's eyes as she grows up having to adjust as her surroundings do. Overall, a fantastic read.
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on 2 May 2009
I found this book a very innovative way to write autobiography. I now have a better understanding of the Iranian Society. I liked the part when the parents came from abroad hiding a rock band's poster in their overcoat. It just emphasised the fact that human instincts and desire to express oneself cannot be supressed no matter how tough the institutions and authority asserts themselves to be. I also found it to be a very honest expression of ones life. Congratulations to the author. Looking forward to read Persepolis-2 as the end seemed to be like an episode 'to be continued'.
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on 22 May 2009
As soon as I received this book I was ready to return it because I hadn't realised the story was told using a totally different way to the one I was used to reading. Anyway.
Once I started reading it I was engrossed. The story flows easily and is a very interesting one. The characters are well formed and likeable. I couldn't put it down! Unbelievable (if you consider my first reaction) but so very true.
I'd highly recommend it to anyone because it tells a very serious story in a fun way without making fun of the context.. if you know what I mean..
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on 23 September 2015
One young woman's struggles with politics, freedom, identity and faith in contemporary Iran and France. I found the protagonist/narrator spirited, shrewd, and immediately likeable, and her personal struggles with oppression in Iran and discrimination in France really inspiring. The subject matter might seem heavy going but the narration is interspersed with humour and the artwork is a joy. I quickly finished it and passed it on to my sister who loved it too!
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on 5 March 2015
Rightfully so, this is regarded as one of the greatest examples in the graphic novel genre. It's deceptive naivety and simplicity seduce you into a false sense of security and before you know it you are experiencing the horrors of war and oppression through the eyes of an innocent young girl. You will never look at Kim Wilde in the same way again. A powerful and encouraging story that also stands up as a great historical document too.
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on 4 January 2014
An interesting view of a girl becoming a woman first in a very different, and at times rapidly changing, society, and then effectively in a form of exile. One theme that seems to run through it is that the author loves her family but appears to dislike or fall out with the vast majority of everyone else she meets. Though this isn't surprising considering the changes she was facing.
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on 11 February 2016
Insightful, educational, and powerful. An incredible read into the history and the culture of Iran, and one that opened my eyes up to my own ignorance and lack of knowledge about it. I also loved the drawings! I thought they were beautiful. This book is an informative, funny, and moving tale about a country full of struggle and trauma and the people that live there.
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on 25 June 2010
Marjane Satrapi's creation is splendid. But if you are thinking of buying the ordinary paperback edition, don't do so without checking to see that the print is large enough for comfortable reading. I found it too small after trying about 20 pages and transferred the book abruptly to my 'charity shop' pile. Penguin did a paperback edition of 'Maus' in a sensible size; why couldn't these publishers have been equally sensible? Too fond of a fast buck, I suspect. I hope Ms Satrapi castigates them sternly.
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on 21 December 2015
Brilliant book, but the writing is so small I had to use a magnifying glass!!!!!
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