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on 23 July 2017
Interesting Read, but only had a few major points.
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on 23 September 2017
Very interesting
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on 22 September 2017
The book is filled with lots of relative stories which combined with the principle behind which this book is based (myelin) it offers a great insight to skill.

Personally I found the last few chapters abit tedious but overall I would recommend
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on 14 June 2017
Mind blowing some fantastic details and facts about how people learn and grow to be great. Loved it ended too quick wanted more stories
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on 10 September 2017
Very insightful and inspiring. The talent code will reveal new ideas in a thoroughly enjoyable way with lots of real life examples to dive the point home.
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on 11 July 2017
I have never been quite so addicted to getting back to a book. This is an incredible read, keeping me amazed and excited from page to page.

Myelin is King!!!
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on 18 August 2017
Thoroughly good and interesting read.
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on 10 April 2017
vg
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on 2 September 2009
An interesting read about how "talent" develops. Apparently in most cases, such a thing as talent does not exist, and it is more down to how hard you work and practice.
First, you need "ignition", an event that makes you want to become great at something.
Secondly, you need mentoring, a teacher who can support you and correct your errors.
Thirdly, you need deep practice, a state of deep focus where you analyse what you are doing in the finest detail and correct your errors.
The purpose of practice is to strengthen the myelin strand coatings in the brain to strengthen brain connections made during practice.
Overall, a good book, useful to parents, and anyone involved in studying and learning of any kind.
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on 1 September 2012
Daniel Coyle's thesis is fairly basic. Talent is not inherent, but can be grown. This puts him fairly firmly on the side of the nurture side of the nature/nurture debate. But that's not what's central, as he says; that debate is pretty unproductive. He's trying to define what kinds of nurturing factors can grow talent, and splits them into two main groups: ignition and learning.

The learning techniques he describes well, calling the most successful process he identifies 'deep practice'. With examples, he demonstrates how even the most successful talents have put huge amounts of carefully coached effort into becoming great. As he quotes Michelangelo as saying, if only they knew how much work it took. This is something like 3-5hrs a day for 7-10years, to reach the 'magic' figure of 10,000 hours. Coyle does fall into the pop-science trap of fixating on one particular element of building neural skills patterns - myelin - and repeating that word as often as he can throughout the book. However, the neurological theory which explains the process of skill-building is explained clearly.

So far, so clear. But then the book moves on to talk about the second factor - ignition. It is fairly easy to explain and have your readers accept that huge amounts of hard-working-practice can develop great skills. It is much less easy to show the factors which enable people to develop and maintain the motivation and focus to keep working at that level for such a long time. Randomly disconnected facts are thrown at us: a disproportionate number of successful politicians and scientists lost a parent at a young age; 100m mens' sprint champions are nearly all younger sons; there is an ignition effect when 'someone like me' achieves, enabling me to believe that 'I can too'. There's a strange chapter in praise of a charter school system with a single-minded academic focus and high levels of discipline which seems at odds with Coyle's approval of a basketball coach's speech earlier that 'I'm not going to treat you all the same... because you're all different.' The whole thing doesn't take us much further than the current London 2012 Olympic slogan, imploring us to 'inspire a generation'. That's a wonderfully positive sentiment. But it pretty much begs the question of how we get (and more to the point, keep) people positively motivated.

Perhaps it's a little unfair to ask for a book this size to answer that question, but it is disappointing, after the clarity of the first part of his thesis, that the author doesn't advance a coherent theory of the second part.
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