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4.6 out of 5 stars
57
Leave it to Psmith
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on 28 September 2017
Its PG at his best again
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on 24 August 2014
Excellent
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on 9 November 2014
good read
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on 12 March 2015
Great product, well described, quickly dispatched.
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on 10 September 2014
great
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on 30 May 2016
For some reason this is a first time for me to read this author but just briefly looking through I can see it will be enjoyable With thanks.
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on 23 April 2010
Having read many of the jeeves stories 20 years ago and watched again recently the ITV Jeeves and Wooster starring Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie, I thought it was time to get back to Wodehouse for some good cheer. But, I wanted to start on something different, so I decided to start with the Blandings novels - this is the second in the series. As someone who struggles to get a night sleep because of pain, it was a sheer delight for me to have the tonic of reading this book peopled with its eccentric characthers and its convoluted plot where nobody is who they claim to be.

The young upper class PSmith is the most striking characther here and has some of the best lines in the book and of course, we have Lord Emsworth appearing again - this time seeming even madder - starting lunch with a poet and continuing lunch with a different person (Psmith) who he thinks is the same person resulting in confusion and impersonation down in Blandings. But the plot about the stealing of a necklace is a real howl with everyone pretending to be someonelse and Baxter Lord Emsworth's sercretary really losing it in trying to track down the thief. I read this in 2 days and enjoyed every page. Thanks Mr Wodehouse - hope you are enjoying eternity!
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on 11 July 2017
In my opinion, the ultimate Wodehouse. PG has pulled out all the stops here, and the scene where he borrows an umbrella to help a lady retain the shape of her hat is priceless. I love the Jeeves books, but in this one volume, we have Psmith (the p is silent as in pherring and pcomedy) and the family from Blandings, recently dramatised on TV. I was disappointed that they never thought to make this book into one of the Blandings episodes. Certainly the best of the Psmith books as well.
Go for it, and enjoy a comedy up there with Jerome K and the best of the genre.
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on 17 February 2006
Introduce the wonderful Psmith into the world of Blandings Castle and the combination is comic dynamite. Whilst the Jeeves and Wooster collection is probably the finest series from the pen of P.G. Wodehouse, this simply marvellous book is arguably his finest hour. You'll never think about flowerpots in the same way again.
Read, delight and enjoy!
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on 8 January 2004
"Leave it to Psmith" concludes the evolution of the Psmith character, from Wodehouse's earliest style of writing with the "Schools" genre, to a comic character whose dialogue keeps the reader entertained throughout. This story sees Psmith enter into Blandings Castle, and though Lord Emsworth is not the dominant character he later becomes, flashes of brilliance are visible in his appearances (and in those of Lady Constance, who plays an important role in this book).
"Leave it to Psmith" is packed full of witty dialogue, readily suited to Psmith's character, and the traditional Wodehouse farce for the plot (misunderstandings, a stolen necklace, and so forth). The ending is predictable, of course, but this is hardly the point. It is the use of language that makes this such an enjoyable tale. Wodehouse connoisseurs all have their own favourite phrases, or particular sections of books that strike them as humorous from the prolific collection of Wodehouse's works. Suffice to say, several of my personal favourite sections appear in this book - Psmith at the employment agency, or describing his career as a fishmonger spring to mind. Those who enjoy the Blandings or Jeeves and Wooster series would do well to read this book.
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