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on 16 June 2013
One of the best books in the genre I have read so far. The plot was very intriguing, characters extremely well shaped and believable, great accuracy in period detail, twists and turns in the story which keep you gripped and surprise you. Couldn't have found a better book to plunge in gas-lit London. Murder, mystery, unconventional detection. It's all here with the bonus of a fluid and well organised prose. Highly recommend it.
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on 25 October 2014
great read
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VINE VOICEon 20 September 2009
I was very excited to buy this bok as it is my very favourite period and place. I also love the genre. Unfortunately, it just didn't work, in my opinion. The writing is trite and the characters very one-dimenional and flat. The story was fast paced and enjoyable but there was quite an exhausting list of undeveloped characters to keep track of. I can see why people would enjoy it; the sense of history and setting is very realistic but the writer's style just didn't work.
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on 8 October 2008
This is a really good read.I loved the period detail of the characters and locations.
Anybody into this kind of book I,m sure will enjoy.
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on 2 July 2007
`A most dangerous woman' is the fifth book by Lee Jackson, now writing as L M Jackson. With the change of authorial name, Lee would seem to have found his true writer's voice.

And a great read it is; a fast flowing romp through Victorian London with more twists, turns and blind alleys than one would find in a Dickensian Rookery! I am perhaps fortunate in having worked in many of the places in London described in Lee's books and at a time when they were probably not that different from the 19th Century. I can assure you that Lee is scrupulous with his settings and accurate in his descriptions. We can expect no less from the creator of victorianlondon.org!

If Lee's new voice means we can look forward to more recreations of the Victorian `Penny Dreadful', then we are all in for an enjoyable, as well as informative, treat!
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on 5 May 2014
This would be more suitable for older teenagers.The plot was quite good had some description of old London.Worth reading for encouraging young readers
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on 3 April 2009
I love books of this genre but I have to say this didn't quite grab me. Dissapointing. Not an engrossing read.
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on 20 July 2017
Lee Jackson has changed his narrative style as well as his name for this novel. As always with him, this is quality writing, with Victorian East London, and Victorian East Londoners, brought vividly to life.
We've seen amateur female detectives before, but most such women tend to be from the over-privileged classes, whereas Sarah Tanner, like Kitty Peck, is a working-class East London girl with courage, intelligence, and moral fibre. She is the underdog, and Mr. Jackson leads us easily into rooting for her. The murder mystery she resolves to solve is well structured, and just avoids being too convoluted.
This is the work of a writer who is totally at home with Neo-Victorian crime fiction. Strongly recommended for those who love the genre.
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on 27 February 2009
All the authentic Victorian feel and detailing of Lee Jackson's previous books are strong and present here, and we're introduced to an attractive new heroine. Sarah Tanner is no angel, in many respects, but has admirable pluck and resourcefulness in spades. This book grips you and drags you down some of the more squalid and dangerous alleys of the period. These locales range from some famous stews like St Giles to less-used neighbourhoods like Leather Lane, admirably avoiding the Vic-fic cliché locations (It's so refreshing that no-one in this novel ventures into Spitalfields at all.) The plot takes in prostitution, murder aplenty and money-grabbing marriages, and keeps you guessing and glued. This is excellent and evocative storytelling, with a satisfying tendency towards moral ambiguity, that keeps you turning pages and yearning for more.
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on 14 January 2009
First the positive. Mr Jackson clearly knows his period well and, unlike many similar authors, it never feels forced and he creates his world beautifully, everything fitting with wonderful subtlety. Full marks for it.

The book moves along at an excellent pace - so much so some of the 'mmmmm' moments about slightly dubious plotting with a few too many coincidences and stereotypical characters do tend to whiz by. But certainly there is more than enough for me to look forward and try the next book.

One suggestion though? Employ a better proof reader. It is unlikely the purple silk was stained in the attack on Bert - she'd already removed it and swapped into the red cotton, remember? And suddenly going from Sarah Tanner to Turner a couple of sentences later further on in the book is just a tad careless.
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