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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 6 April 2015
Cycling phenomenon Mark Cavendish has had more than a few ups and downs with his public reputation during his cycling career, and At Speed covers the years of his career since Boy Racer and up until the end of 2013 in a way that doesn't gloss over his faults - indeed he often makes fun of his own fallibility.

Yet it also presents him as a decent person underneath it all who remembers the contributions teammates and support staff make to his moment of glory over the finishing line. Praise of others is a frequent theme during the book.

Cavendish does a pretty good job of explaining how professional road racing works - the role of lead out men, the reason echelons can be so deadly in a race with strong cross-winds, and so on. Therefore you don't have to be cycling expert by any means to enjoy his account of being one of the country's most successful sportsmen.

Having been such a close cycling colleague of both Bradley Wiggins and Chris Froome, Mark Cavendish inevitably strays into the rights and wrongs of Froome's behaviour during Wiggins's Tour de France win. Although generally sympathetic to Froome, what comes out most clearly from Cavendish's account of the tensions is how both of them (and indeed he himself) have to be hugely focused on their own personal career in order to achieve their greatness. So while all three can all be nice, friendly people at times and get along, when the tension mounts so does the fractiousness - and when it comes to the crunch they all put themselves first.

The audio version of the book is brilliantly narrated by Matthew Delamere who, judging by Mark Cavendish's TV interviews, invokes just the right attitude towards life and general demeanour with his choice of tone and intonation for the narration.
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on 3 August 2017
Refreshingly honest account of a man who has undoubtedly been subjected to the modern pressures of instant worldwide press coverage. Very enlightening and a great insight into the complex world of professional cycling. Nice one Mr C.
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on 10 May 2016
In the narration of this book Cav portrays himself as very self centered. For a top performing athlete, being focused is probably a necessary attribute. In a book however, it can become somewhat irksome / tiresome for the reader. I really admire Mark for all of his achievements but personally found Chris Froome's autobiography *The Climb" more of a journey with human interest & easier to empathize with. Sorry Cav!
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on 29 January 2014
In this book Mr. Cavendish does not disappoint those of us who were expecting a warts and all account of the intervening years since the publication of his previous book "Boy Racer". At times sad and at others delightfully witty, the reader is treated to the story behind the rise and fall of HTC - Colombia, the move to Team Sky and subsequent agreement for the, so far, extremely successful move to Omega Pharma - Quickstep.
If you enjoyed "Boy Racer", or are a fan of the self styled "Fast Sprinter, Faster Talker" from the Isle of Man, then you will enjoy this book.
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on 18 August 2015
A winner.
This book says it all.
For cyclists it is a must read book.
For non cyclists it is a must read book.
It gets to the heart of the sport and the man.

Riveting
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on 11 March 2014
Having got into Road cycling recently I thought it might be good to get an insight into the strategy and inside track of pro racing so bought the book. It gives the reader a good idea of whats been happening with certain teams and how certain races were targeted.

Included the politics and behind the scenes dealings with team owners and riders.

Overall a good read that will enlighten the reader to make them appreciate the intricateness's of the sport next time they are watching a race on TV.
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on 10 February 2014
From the first page I knew this book would be a good read. Cav's quirky sense of humour and style of writing is a joy to read. Great to learn of his thoughts before, during and after a race and also nice to get an insight into how he ticks, off his bike. Would recommend this book to all who admire and enjoy both Mark Cavendish and cycling.
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on 3 September 2014
An excellent insight into the life and mind of an amazing winner. Cavendish provides a refreshingly open and honest appraisal of his character, and is not afraid to bare his soul, warts and all. This makes the book believable, and human. I'd recommend this book for both cycling enthusiasts and those just interested in what makes a sporting champion.
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on 8 December 2013
Mark talks about everything. His faults, his regrets, his loves, his achievements and his hopes for the future. He openly criticises or praises where he thinks it's deserved. Did he hold anything back? Seems not. When you've read this book you feel you really know him.
Could I live with him? Probably not. He's far too "driven" for my laid-back (aka lazy) character - but I'm delighted that others can and that he has a great family. Good luck to him.
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on 30 June 2014
Interested in cycling then this book is perfect! I've just got into cycling myself and found cav inspired my decision to buy my first road bike. Read both books now and their fantastic reads. Gutted he married PETA though she's beautiful! Lucky man!
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