Learn more Download now Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Exclusive track - Ed Sheeran Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's



on 30 October 2013
The way you react to a statement is all in the context. If Jigsaw asks, "Do you want to play a game?" The chances are you are about to embark on a rather painful experience. If Dave Gorman asks the same things, you are likely to say, "Yes please" as he appears to be a thoroughly nice chap. Gorman is best known for his storytelling stand-up routines, but anyone who has read `Are You Dave Gorman', or `Unchained America' will also know that he is a very amusing writer. His work is usually based around some sort of task or bet that he has made up and to an extent the same things happens with `Dave Gorman vs. The World'.

After finding idle time between arriving at his destination and his gigs, Gorman decided to ask the people of Twitter is they would like to play a game (not computer games). The replies were numerous and led to many new adventures all tracked in this book. Unlike in previous Gorman books the task of playing games is looser and is really an excuse for Gorman to meet new people and make witty remarks on what he finds. He is a master of doing just this. His observational comedy is warm and very amusing. He is also able to structure some great humour; a joke can bubble along for chapters and pop up again with great hilarity.

The one issue with the book is that is lacks structure. Gorman admits that he never planned to go on adventures in gaming and the book feels like this. A series of essays could have worked, or creating a `lad bet' e.g. I will win 100 games before The World. Instead this is a book caught between two stools. Thankfully, these are stools found in the type of pub that you are unlikely to be head-butted in. A very funny amble through Gorman's life.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 26 September 2017
If you like Gorman's other books, you'll like this too! Although there's a drastic change in tone from his usual fare in the penultimate chapter (in which he plays a game with a hostile stranger with ulterior motives). That section left me feeling unsettled.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 22 August 2017
I listened to this on a coach journey to Antwerp, time flew by.

Not much else to say, really
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 9 November 2017
Happy with item
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
VINE VOICEon 16 September 2011
I've enjoyed Dave Gorman's previous books but for some reason this one was a bit of a disappointment.

Dave likes playing games - not computer games, but "proper" games, maybe involving a board, maybe something you throw, possibly cards or other things you place on a table. One day he posted a message on Twitter asking if anyone fancied playing a game and he received numerous responses inviting him to play the likes of Cluedo, Monopoly, and some less familiar examples such as Khet, Kubb, and IDVE. The book then sees Dave travel around the country to meet these people and play a game. Some of these meetings are planned, some are not - such as when he is invited to play a card game with some elderly American tourists in a Lakeland hotel - and some are eventful whilst others aren't.

Despite the occasional laughs the book feels a little aimless, as though Dave doesn't really know what to do with it. Some of his other books have eventually had some kind of moment of epiphany, where he's had something of a moment of clarity and discovered something about life etc. but this time he just wanders from meeting to meeting and the book doesn't even have an ending - a fact he admits himself on the final page. I confess that at the end I did feel a little "oh - is that it?" despite having enjoyed most of my time with the book.

I did like the numerous footnotes, many of which include web links to YouTube clips etc. explaining passages from the text, and the cover is very nicely designed. The book itself though is amiable but a bit aimless, and therefore a little disappointing.
0Comment| 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 25 June 2011
I'm a bit of a Dave Gorman fan. Not the creepy, stalky kind, but I narrowly missed his 'Are You Dave Gorman?' gig, caught and thoroughly enjoyed his 'Googlewhack' gig, read and liked both his earlier books, and am always happy to see him pop up on TV. So I was pleased when my partner bought this book to read on a recent holiday, and have just read it myself.

The thing is, though, I don't think it matters if you've never heard of Dave Gorman, because this is a really good book. It's well-written, funny, engaging and very readable. Dave Gorman manages to reflect on subjects including friendship, relationships, tribalism, gender and risk without ever getting heavy or didactic. The 'voice' of the book is consistent and assured, and the way Dave Gorman writes the surprising end section is beautifully judged. If you enjoy quirky, humorous memoir or travelogue, I'd recommend this book highly.
0Comment| 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 30 October 2013
The way you react to a statement is all in the context. If Jigsaw asks, "Do you want to play a game?" The chances are you are about to embark on a rather painful experience. If Dave Gorman asks the same things, you are likely to say, "Yes please" as he appears to be a thoroughly nice chap. Gorman is best known for his storytelling stand-up routines, but anyone who has read `Are You Dave Gorman', or `Unchained America' will also know that he is a very amusing writer. His work is usually based around some sort of task or bet that he has made up and to an extent the same things happens with `Dave Gorman vs. The World'.

After finding idle time between arriving at his destination and his gigs, Gorman decided to ask the people of Twitter is they would like to play a game (not computer games). The replies were numerous and led to many new adventures all tracked in this book. Unlike in previous Gorman books the task of playing games is looser and is really an excuse for Gorman to meet new people and make witty remarks on what he finds. He is a master of doing just this. His observational comedy is warm and very amusing. He is also able to structure some great humour; a joke can bubble along for chapters and pop up again with great hilarity.

The one issue with the book is that is lacks structure. Gorman admits that he never planned to go on adventures in gaming and the book feels like this. A series of essays could have worked, or creating a `lad bet' e.g. I will win 100 games before The World. Instead this is a book caught between two stools. Thankfully, these are stools found in the type of pub that you are unlikely to be head-butted in. A very funny amble through Gorman's life.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 4 March 2017
I'm a fan of Dave Gorman and his factual yet funny style or writing / presenting and this book ticks all the boxes.

This book is about Dave travelling the country playing games (not computer games though) with random people from the internet or with people he meets on his travels. The book was an entertaining read on my commute to and from work and even introduced me to a few games I've never heard of before.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
VINE VOICEon 7 October 2012
Dave Gorman has effectively created the bloke-meets-challenge genre. Previous escapades have involved searching for namesakes (Are You Dave Gorman?), internet search anomalies (Dave Gorman's Googlewhack Adventure), and brand-free roadtrips (America Unchained).

Whereas the first of these starts out as a bet, and the third was born out of an idea for a film, the principle behind this book is more similar to "Googlewhack", i.e. Gorman has the spark of an idea and then runs with it, and out the other end comes a book.

But because this is now a tried and tested method, there is always the lingering doubt that it's never as spontaneous as it first appears. "If it's all done off-the-cuff, how does he remember so much about it?" is a question that springs to mind throughout (certainly the beginning of) this book. In fact, there is a whole chapter devoted to his agent and an agency discussing his latest "project" as Gorman looks innocently on, wondering what they could be talking about. I'm not convinced, but I can let that sort of thing slide if the "story" is worth reading.

The writing style is clever enough and funny enough to keep me interested. There is a mix of games that hark back to my childhood, combined with a few new games that I might now seek out and play myself. The book is a mixture of a story of a man trying to fill time while his loved one is away and a nostalgic look back at how people of a certain age used to play board games all the time.

As a writer, I think Gorman is one of the best at what he does. This doesn't capture the imagination like Are You Dave Gorman?, or Danny Wallace's Yes Man or Join Me: The True Story of a Man Who Started a Cult by Accident, but as a trip down memory lane for thriysomething blokes, it'll do just fine.
0Comment| 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
VINE VOICEon 18 January 2012
Dave Gorman has effectively created the bloke-meets-challenge genre. Previous escapades have involved searching for namesakes (Are You Dave Gorman?, internet search anomalies Dave Gorman's Googlewhack Adventure, and brand-free roadtrips America Unchained.

Whereas the first of these starts out as a bet, and the third was born out of an idea for a film, the principle behind this book is more similar to "Googlewhack", i.e. Gorman has the spark of an idea and then runs with it, and out the other end comes a book.

But because this is now a tried and tested method, there is always the lingering doubt that it's never as spontaneous as it first appears. "If it's all done off-the-cuff, how does he remember so much about it?" is a question that springs to mind throughout (certainly the beginning of) this book. In fact, there is a whole chapter devoted to his agent and an agency discussing his latest "project" as Gorman looks innocently on, wondering what they could be talking about. I'm not convinced, but I can let that sort of thing slide if the "story" is worth reading.

The writing style is clever enough and funny enough to keep me interested. There is a mix of games that hark back to my childhood, combined with a few new games that I might now seek out and play myself. The book is a mixture of a story of a man trying to fill time while his loved one is away and a nostalgic look back at how people of a certain age used to play board games all the time.

As a writer, I think Gorman is one of the best at what he does. This doesn't capture the imagination like Are You Dave Gorman?, or Danny Wallace's Yes Man or Join Me: The True Story of a Man Who Started a Cult by Accident, but as a trip down memory lane for thriysomething blokes, it'll do just fine.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)