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on 25 May 2013
Dated now, but still good reading or those with an interest in flying.
The writing style is , well, seventy years old, but an excellent insight to flight training in the 40s.
Readable, but may require a little more effort than modern texts.
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on 15 November 2017
Person bought for was happy with it.
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on 23 June 2017
well written
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on 30 December 2003
I thought I had aeroplane control sussed as a student. A bit rough at the edges and things occasionally happened that I wasn't quite expecting, but good enough and nothing dangerous... Until I read this book.
Langewiesche has writtten a masterpeice on the "art" of flying and is still compulsive reading after 60 years in print. His references are occasionally quaint, such as comparing the "gait" of your aeroplane to the gait of your horse and referring to the elevator as "flippers" (the latter being much less misleading).
If only he'd also written books called "A Practical Guide to International Politics", "Crime Fighting Made Simple" and "Understanding Women" the word would be a better place ;o)
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on 5 August 2001
This book helped rid me of the feeling in my first few hours of flying that I was not let in on what everyone else knew. It really clarifies those hazy edges when you're trying to take on such foreign skills. Someone should have told him that women have been known to fly too, though!
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on 14 October 1998
One would think that any book on piloting written so long ago, just couldn't be useful. This is far from the case. What Mr. Langewiesche has done is amazing. He has brought what could have been a complex explaination on the art of flight to the level of the typical non-pilot.
He has made it a great read, rather than a dry and somewhat boreing dissertation on the dynamics of flight. I personally have left the ranks of active pilots some years ago, yet, I occasionally crack the pages and in so doing, I find some of my many memorys of flight, brought back to vivid life. I highly recommend this book for entry as well as veteran pilots.
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on 3 December 2010
Much like the rest of the reviews, I must stress that this book whilst extremely old doesn't fail to get some valuable messages across. Written from a practical perspective the author looks at each phase of flight in turn, analysing the physics of flight in a clear concise manner.

In particular the section on 'the Dangers of the air' is excellent, where the author clearly differentiates between what we tend to perceive as dangers and the very real hazards that often go un-noticed. For example we are all too aware of weather as a source of hazard and indeed engine failures, but it remains that the majority of aircraft accidents are in fact due to loss of situational awareness and incorrect manipulation of the controls when suddenly we are faced with an unusual flight condition.

In short Langeweische develops a clear analysis between of interaction between the aeroplance and the pilot and how this can sometimes can go seriously wrong even in the hands of an experienced professional, due to the fact that in times of crisis we naturally tend to attempt to get 'straight and level' rather than delaing directly with the primary cause. For example how many of us would actually drop the nose and recover from a stall close to the ground, when our body is natuarally telling us to avoid the ground. The same goes for the paradox of the glide, ie pulling up will not stretch the glide etc.

All in all, without trying to re-write the entire text! a fantastic book thoroughly recommended to all pilots from student PPL through to time served professionals.
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on 8 July 1998
Langewiesche has written the definitive book on aircraft manipulation. I learned more from this book than all the others I have read combined. Clear, concise, and well-written, no pilot should be without it.
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on 27 September 1997
Stick & Rudder is an all time favorite about how an airplane flies. Written over 50 years ago, it explains in a very easy-to-understand manner the basic four forces of flight, the three axis of motion, how an airfoil works, how basic aerodynamics affects flight, and how to perform the fundamental maneuvers. The information is as valid now as the day it was written. As a ground and flight instructor, I have used this as a basic text for all my students for the past 12 years. Discusses in detail straight & level flight, climbs and descents, turns, stalls, takeoffs, landings, torque, various aircraft configurations, and piloting techniques. An absolute "must have" for every pilot from Recreational to Airline Transport certificate, this is the FIRST book every aspiring pilot should read.
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on 6 October 2010
Having read stick and rudder, the most valuable part of the book is "dangers to pilots" and it essentially talks about the percieved dangers, engine failure, weather etc. The reality is the biggest danger which may be induced by any of the perceived dangers is "stalling at slow speed close to the ground" typically going slow and turning at the same time. The wings stall and the aircraft falls, the normal reaction is to pull back on the stick, making it worse not better. The results are normally pretty ugly. Interesting, instructional and sobering reading.

The book is pretty wordy, and parts can be tough reading but challenges lots of the perceived norms and the usual stuff instructors say and "gloss" over. Valuable in their own right. A simple way of working out if, when gliding after engine failure, if you are going to make it over a wire or not.

I can't stress enough, the last chapters are the most vital in the book and I've re-read it several times.

A keeper.
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