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on 27 April 2017
Revelation portayed in CS Lewis style
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on 5 April 2013
I bought it to read myself & to give to my youngest grandson.. CS lewis never fails. good that the main characters are always youngsters
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on 27 April 2017
This amazing story is about Lucy and Edmund Pevinsie going to stay with their aunt Alberta Scrubb and her son Eustace Clarence Scrubb. The picture in the bedroom came to life and they went through it into Narnia. This is unusual because things like that don’t happen in real life. In Narnia, they met king Caspian and Reepicheep upon the Dawn Treader. Caspian goes in search of his father’s seven friends who were sent away. Reepicheep is off to find Aslan’s kingdom at the end of the world. It took a few months at least to get to the world’s end. It has a dramatic start going through the picture.
The main character is Eustace. At the start, he was an antagonist wanting to give Lucy and Edmund a tough time. In Narnia, he made enemies with Reepicheep and swung him by the tail. He howled and cried when he was on board the Dawn Treader. After they stopped at an island, Eustace ran off and found some treasure. Overnight he turned into a … dragon. He went back and found the crew and they thought that he was Lord Octesian because he put on a golden bracelet which belonged to Lord Octesian. Lucy asked him if he was Lord Octesian but as he wasn’t he shook his head. Lucy then asked if it was Eustace and he nodded. Lucy gave him some of the cordial which reduced the swelling but didn’t dissolve the gold. One night, Edmund awoke and saw someone – it was Eustace the boy. Eustace told him what had happened – how he met Aslan and tried to take off the dragon skin. He couldn’t do it so Aslan dug his claws in and ripped the dragon skin off. It hurt but it was all for the better. That changed Eustace completely.
This story is written in the third person e.g. he/she. It was a fantastic story because when I read it, a lot of the time I had to go to the dictionary to find out what some of the words meant. CS Lewis described the setting in detail because I could picture it in my head.
I would recommend this story because it is so fantastic because at the end when they met the lamb and had a breakfast of fish with it, it reminded me of the bible when the disciples had fish for breakfast with Jesus, the Lamb. The lamb then turned into Aslan who said that they could enter his kingdom from their world where he would be known as another name – Jesus Christ. He is the Lion and the Lamb.
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The second volume of the Narnia Chronicles closed with the possibility of Lucy and Edmund -- though not their older siblings -- returning to Narnia. "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" makes good on that story, with the intrepid pair (plus a whiny cousin) returning on a strange sea voyage.

After the events of "Prince Caspian," Lucy and Edmund are sent off to stay with their obnoxious cousin Eustace. But when they admire a picture of a strange ship, suddenly all three kids are sucked in -- and land in a Narnian sea. On board the ship is King Caspian, now fully grown, who is determined to find a bunch of knights exiled by his murderous uncle, even if he has to go to the edge of the world (literally).

Lucy and Edmund are thrilled to be back in Narnia again, but Eustance proceeds to make trouble any way he can, complaining and causing trouble among the crew. But there are problems more horrifying than any of them can guess, from dragons to sinister "gold water" to a region filled with their worst nightmares.

"The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" is one of Lewis's most original and tightly-written Narnian adventures. It's also a bit of a break from form. After two books of battles against evil tyrants, "Voyage" simply goes where no man/woman/mouse has gone before, and gives us a view of the Narnian world as more than one isolated little region.

And in some ways, it's also the darkest Chronicle. Lewis explores the theme of greed here -- greed for power, beauty, money and magic -- and has some scenes both chilling and majestic. But his archly humorous style peeks through in several places, whether it's pompous mouse Reepicheep or tea with a reclusive old wizard.

Edmund and Lucy are their usual plucky selves, albeit a bit more mature than before. But "Voyage" also introduces one of Lewis' most interesting characters in Eustace Clarence Scrubb. Like Edmund, Eustace is initially a peevish, lying boy who generally makes trouble, but slowly learns his errors. But unlike Edmund, Eustace doesn't have to ally himself to the baddie to learn that.

"Voyage of the Dawn Treader" was a turning point for the Narnia Chronicles, as well as the one that began venturing into darker territory. Engaging and tightly written.
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The second volume of the Narnia Chronicles closed with the possibility of Lucy and Edmund -- though not their older siblings -- returning to Narnia. "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" makes good on that story, with the intrepid pair (plus a whiny cousin) returning on a strange sea voyage.
After the events of "Prince Caspian," Lucy and Edmund are sent off to stay with their obnoxious cousin Eustace. But when they admire a picture of a strange ship, suddenly all three kids are sucked in -- and land in a Narnian sea. On board the ship is King Caspian, now fully grown, who is determined to find a bunch of knights exiled by his murderous uncle, even if he has to go to the edge of the world (literally).
Lucy and Edmund are thrilled to be back in Narnia again, but Eustance proceeds to make trouble any way he can, complaining and causing trouble among the crew. But there are problems more horrifying than any of them can guess, from dragons to sinister "gold water" to a region filled with their worst nightmares.
"The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" is one of Lewis's most original and tightly-written Narnian adventures. It's also a bit of a break from form. After two books of battles against evil tyrants, "Voyage" simply goes where no man/woman/mouse has gone before, and gives us a view of the Narnian world as more than one isolated little region.
And in some ways, it's also the darkest Chronicle. Lewis explores the theme of greed here -- greed for power, beauty, money and magic -- and has some scenes both chilling and majestic. But his archly humorous style peeks through in several places, whether it's pompous mouse Reepicheep or tea with a reclusive old wizard.
Edmund and Lucy are their usual plucky selves, albeit a bit more mature than before. But "Voyage" also introduces one of Lewis' most interesting characters in Eustace Clarence Scrubb. Like Edmund, Eustace is initially a peevish, lying boy who generally makes trouble, but slowly learns his errors. But unlike Edmund, Eustace doesn't have to ally himself to the baddie to learn that.
"Voyage of the Dawn Treader" was a turning point for the Narnia Chronicles, as well as the one that began venturing into darker territory. Engaging and tightly written.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
The second volume of the Narnia Chronicles closed with the possibility of Lucy and Edmund -- though not their older siblings -- returning to Narnia. "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" makes good on that story, with the intrepid pair (plus a whiny cousin) returning on a strange sea voyage.
After the events of "Prince Caspian," Lucy and Edmund are sent off to stay with their obnoxious cousin Eustace. But when they admire a picture of a strange ship, suddenly all three kids are sucked in -- and land in a Narnian sea. On board the ship is King Caspian, now fully grown, who is determined to find a bunch of knights exiled by his murderous uncle, even if he has to go to the edge of the world (literally).
Lucy and Edmund are thrilled to be back in Narnia again, but Eustance proceeds to make trouble any way he can, complaining and causing trouble among the crew. But there are problems more horrifying than any of them can guess, from dragons to sinister "gold water" to a region filled with their worst nightmares.
"The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" is one of Lewis's most original and tightly-written Narnian adventures. It's also a bit of a break from form. After two books of battles against evil tyrants, "Voyage" simply goes where no man/woman/mouse has gone before, and gives us a view of the Narnian world as more than one isolated little region.
And in some ways, it's also the darkest Chronicle. Lewis explores the theme of greed here -- greed for power, beauty, money and magic -- and has some scenes both chilling and majestic. But his archly humorous style peeks through in several places, whether it's pompous mouse Reepicheep or tea with a reclusive old wizard.
Edmund and Lucy are their usual plucky selves, albeit a bit more mature than before. But "Voyage" also introduces one of Lewis' most interesting characters in Eustace Clarence Scrubb. Like Edmund, Eustace is initially a peevish, lying boy who generally makes trouble, but slowly learns his errors. But unlike Edmund, Eustace doesn't have to ally himself to the baddie to learn that.
"Voyage of the Dawn Treader" was a turning point for the Narnia Chronicles, as well as the one that began venturing into darker territory. Engaging and tightly written.
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The second volume of the Narnia Chronicles closed with the possibility of Lucy and Edmund -- though not their older siblings -- returning to Narnia. "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" makes good on that story, with the intrepid pair (plus a whiny cousin) returning on a strange sea voyage.
After the events of "Prince Caspian," Lucy and Edmund are sent off to stay with their obnoxious cousin Eustace. But when they admire a picture of a strange ship, suddenly all three kids are sucked in -- and land in a Narnian sea. On board the ship is King Caspian, now fully grown, who is determined to find a bunch of knights exiled by his murderous uncle, even if he has to go to the edge of the world (literally).
Lucy and Edmund are thrilled to be back in Narnia again, but Eustance proceeds to make trouble any way he can, complaining and causing trouble among the crew. But there are problems more horrifying than any of them can guess, from dragons to sinister "gold water" to a region filled with their worst nightmares.
"The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" is one of Lewis's most original and tightly-written Narnian adventures. It's also a bit of a break from form. After two books of battles against evil tyrants, "Voyage" simply goes where no man/woman/mouse has gone before, and gives us a view of the Narnian world as more than one isolated little region.
And in some ways, it's also the darkest Chronicle. Lewis explores the theme of greed here -- greed for power, beauty, money and magic -- and has some scenes both chilling and majestic. But his archly humorous style peeks through in several places, whether it's pompous mouse Reepicheep or tea with a reclusive old wizard.
Edmund and Lucy are their usual plucky selves, albeit a bit more mature than before. But "Voyage" also introduces one of Lewis' most interesting characters in Eustace Clarence Scrubb. Like Edmund, Eustace is initially a peevish, lying boy who generally makes trouble, but slowly learns his errors. But unlike Edmund, Eustace doesn't have to ally himself to the baddie to learn that.
"Voyage of the Dawn Treader" was a turning point for the Narnia Chronicles, as well as the one that began venturing into darker territory. Engaging and tightly written.
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on 12 January 2007
The third book in the Chronicles of Narnia (or the fifth if you're reading them in chronological order), is a rather unusual book within the context of the series, considering the good-against-evil theme that permeates the other six books in the series is largely absent here. Of course there are dangers and trials, as well as personal conflict that need to be resolved, but because there is no central villain nor any fundamental evil that needs to be defeated, "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" is more thoughtful, more carefully paced, more obviously spiritual and more episodic than any of the other books.

Likewise is the role that the children from our world play within the story. Sadly, Peter and Susan are too old to return to Narnia, and so the adventure belongs to Edmund and Lucy, as well as their horrible cousin Eustace Scrubb who are sucked through a painting in a spare bedroom into Narnia. However, unlike in "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe" and "Prince Caspian", in which they had clear and important roles to play in the unfolding of Narnia's well-being, they are pulled aboard the ship the Dawn Treader in order to...well, just tag along really. Indeed, the children do not even set foot in Narnia throughout the course of the story - but crucially important words are spoken by Aslan at the conclusion of the tale that sheds a whole new light on the meaning behind the children's presence in Narnia: "In your world I have another name. This was the very reason you were brought to Narnia, that by knowing me here for a little while, you may know me better there."

But I'm getting ahead of myself. After Lucy, Edmund and the odious Eustace are aboard the Dawn Treader they discover that their rescuer is Caspian, the boy crowned King at the conclusion of "Prince Caspian". But because of the time difference that exists between Narnia our own world, several years have passed in which Caspian has grown into a young man, whereas Edmund and Lucy remain children. Caspian is on a sea voyage to discover the fates of seven lords who were banished by his evil uncle Miraz; and map the uncharted seas of the East. Also on board is the talking mouse Reepicheep (also introduced in "Prince Caspian") who is on a quest of his own: to find Aslan's Country, said to exist at the eastern end of the world's oceans.

Edmund and Lucy (who are still considered monarchs in Narnia) quickly settle in to the routine of the ship, which is more than can be said for Eustace who seems only capable of making a nuisance of himself in his desire to return to more civilised lands. As the ship sets off into ever more dangerous waters and stopping at islands that become steadily stranger, Eustace eventually must come to find redemption in the discovery of the leonine Aslan - but I won't give away the details of his spiritual transformation, you'll have to read and find out for yourself! It is perhaps Eustace's development that makes up the main plot-thread of the book considering the book opens and closes on his character, though it is certainly not centred around him - Caspian, Edmund, Reepicheep and Lucy all get their chance to shine.

Furthermore, Lewis treats us an imaginative scope of adventure and mystery that is perhaps not matched by any other book in the series in regard to its variety and quantity. Since the fun of reading a book like this is in the discovery of each new marvel presented, it would be wrong of me to list them all - but of course it will come as no surprise to readers that Aslan's presence heavily surrounds the ship and its purpose. Some of Lewis's most overtly Christian connotations are found within "The Voyage" - yet as always, they are not so obtrusive that they become preachy or alienate readers who are not particularly interested in the subtext. Toward the end of the novel in particular, the christological references of the story are beautifully incorporated into the narrative of the story...and again, I have to resist temptation to go into detail!

As always, Lewis fills his books with little touches of intrigue and enigma, for example: the bracelet of a missing lord, which now hangs on a stone outcropping till the world ends, the unspoken sin of a star that was banished to earth, and the friendship that is formed between Lucy and a mermaid in the moment that they both meet and part. Lewis was a master at making small, thought-provoking events that didn't mean much to the overall continuation of the plot, but existed simply for their own sake in enriching and enlivening the story.

For many, "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" is the best book in the series; not to mention their favourite. To be honest, I'm not sure where I stand on such a question, but I do know that it is an unusual (in a good way!) inclusion in the Chronicles, and in many ways a turning point for the series. This is the last book in which Pevensie children play a major part in the action; as Eustace takes over in the next book "The Silver Chair" as protagonist. As such, there is a bittersweet quality to it, which is well in keeping to the nature and purpose of Narnia itself.
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on 25 February 2001
This is my favourite of all the Narnia books. It has a fantastic, chilling ending. It can be read by anybody and indeed should be. It is the only book to have all the main human characters in and most of the famous characters from the series. Their are many versions of the Narnia books available to purchase but In my opinion this is the finest one. The words and lines are evenly spaced, there are fantastic colour drawings, the words are of a perfect size to read and it is printed on laminate paper. It is also worth noting that Pauline Baynes, who's colour drawings are in the book, drew the original drawings for the 1950's version of this book. All in all, this book is excellent!
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on 4 April 2017
This is the book I will read when I know I am dying! What an amazing picture of heaven and hope. Thank you C S Lewis
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