Shop now Shop now Shop now See more Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now DIYED Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
10
4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 25 January 2015
I read a lot of Sci Fi as a young teenager, and some of it was Ursula LeGuin's. I remember liking it, but I couldn't have understood then just what an extraordinary writer she is - for that, you need to bring a little life experience to her work; to be a grown-up, in fact. This is not green-alien, ray-gun-toting, lost-in-space stuff - in fact, to classify it as Sci Fi (or even Science Fantasy) at all is a little misleading. Yes, her stories are set on other worlds, but she uses these scenarios as 'what ifs' to break the mould of the known and expected and explore human life, society and relationships in truly original ways. This is particularly true, in these stories, of her exploration of gender: like many people, I consider myself pretty clued-up and open-minded on gender issues, but I didn't make it more than halfway through the book before I realised that I hadn't been seeing the wood for the trees. The long and short of it is that this is a truly masterly piece of writing and great piece of storytelling. If you prefer to keep your prejudices intact, it's probably not the book for you; if, like me, you enjoy the odd epiphanic experience, I suggest that you get stuck in without delay.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 24 October 1998
This book, like Le Guin's other work, is a treasure. The title story will not be forgotten, and yet it comes last in the collection. You have to read the whole book to really understand how you arrived at the point where the author started: wondering how our lives are shaped by our choices, by our culture, by our families - in short, by story. The collection also has good balance, from the hard parable of "Newton's Sleep" to the silly joke of "The Ascent of the North Face." As a bonus, Le Guin offers an introduction brimming with her views on science fiction, yet touches on her own work only long enough to say what she didn't mean and leaves the rest for the reader. Le Guin is one of the best writers in any genre, and I think this book proves the claim.
0Comment| 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 17 June 1999
Another varied collection fron UlK. Some of the stories are wistful, some silly and indulgent. The strength lies in the cluster of stories around the invention of instantaneous space travel - which is itself an extension of the ansible invented by Shevek in'The Dispossessed'. The last (and title) story is the very best of these and is as good as anything she has ever written. As ever with UlK, she has very little interest in the natural science, though she quickly paints a backdrop which is completely convincing. Instead, she is interested in the human effects. The story is about loss and regret and finding ones way, deciding what to do with one's life and having an opportunity to have part of one's life again. If you are tired of mile long star ships and ravening beams of death then this is the sort of story that you have been waiting for. And you will always remember it.
0Comment| 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 12 August 1998
I read this book two years ago, and honestly, I didn't find most of the stories to be memorable. However, the last story had a profound effect on me. Ursula LeGuin is one of my favorite authors, and "A Fisherman of the Inland Sea" is definitely my favorite LeGuin story. It makes one think about what is really important in life, what makes life worth living (and indeed, liveable at all). It also begs one to ponder the aspects of personal relationships in our society which are often taken for granted. Buy the book if only for the last story. Then read _The Disposessed_ for another side of LeGuin, and another terrific story.
0Comment| 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 4 June 1998
LeGuin 's Earthsea Cycle was the best in fantasy. This collection of short stories is just the same. Great science fiction. I loved each one. Hidden Meanings and well built characters. Great! Go out and but it!!
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 1 January 2014
This is my third Le Guin book and I am totally hooked. She is an excellent writer, bringing the detail of each world to life. I will certainly be buying more of her books for my Kindle.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 26 January 2014
Read this and enjoy a virtuoso display of the noble art of Story Telling. Hauntingly beautiful tales prefaced by a thoughtful treatise on Science Fiction writing in general.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 21 February 2014
Sustained and inventive imagination. Engaging and provoking narrative. Simply classic Le Guin, attentive to detail and wholly human in its scope.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 10 March 2015
Excellent series of stories in the Hainish cycle. All the stories are good not just the one the book is named after.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 2 January 2013
I enjoyed some of the stories but not really my cup of sci-fi - too bogged down in theory for my liking.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse