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This book deserves many more than five stars! Millions of people will lead longer, healthier, and more productive lives from following the advice here.
In the last 15 years, knowledge about how to reduce heart disease has made major strides. This book is the best source I have seen about what has been learned, and how to apply it to help yourself and those you love. You will probably find it helpful to bring your copy along to see your physician because many primary care physicians will not be up-to-date with the latest findings in some areas, such as the use of supplements.
If you liked Mr. Kowalski's first program for controlling cholesterol, originally published in 1987, you will adore this book. When asking himself what had changed he noted, "Why, practically everything is new!" Mr. Kowalski reviews in detail the strengths and weaknesses of that program, describes the research that has been conducted on cardiovascular health since then, and shows you other risks in addition to cholesterol that must be addressed. He also debunks pseudo-science about cholesterol control.
What impressed me the most is that Mr. Kowalski's old and new programs have worked perfectly for him. Here is a man who had his first heart attack at age 35 and double bypass. He had a second heart attack at 41, followed by a quadruple bypass. In the foreword, cardiac surgeon Dr. Jack Sternlieb describes how the most rigorous tests of Mr. Kowalski's heart and arteries show that it has no blockages as of 1999. Without this program, Mr. Kowalski would probably have needed another bypass operation several years ago. His family record of heart disease is not a good one, and he probably has a genetic tendency to problems in this area. Mr. Kowalski is very physically active now, and has no limitations on his life style due to his cardiac history.
The new program has familiar elements in it, but is considerably less restrictive than the old one. You can eat a lot more foods, and a lot more fat (as long as it is the right kind of fat). The dietary guidelines are quite similar to the new ones brought out by the American Heart Association in 2000.
For most people, the diet features avoiding saturated fat and trans fatty acids, limiting overall fat to hold weight at a healthy level for your height, eating fish at least twice a week (especially fatty fish), lots of fruits and vegetables, whole-grain breads and cereals, consuming soluble fiber, lots of fluids, limiting sugars and empty carbohydrates, and eating slowly. Exercise is 15 miles of walking a week. A variety of supplements are encouraged (especially antioxidents, B vitamins, minerals, polysterols, and pantathine). Don't smoke. Limit alcohol consumption to moderate daily levels, but do not imbibe solely for the cardiovascular benefit. Take one aspirin a day if your stomach can handle it.
I liked the candor in the book quite a lot. For example, "I'm a little embarrassed when I look at the subtitle of the original book, which promises 'no deprivation.'"
In addition to the overall recommendations, each element is described in detail including the scientific studies that support why it works, who should not follow the recommendation, how to work with your doctor for the best results, side effects that can occur, and how these recommendations compare with the various prescription medications now available for lowering cholesterol. He also describes how these recommendations affect other factors for cardiovascular risk such as the amount of low-density lipoprotein (a negative component of overall cholesterol), high-density lipoprotein (a positive component of overall cholesterol), triglycerides, homocysteine, and C-reactive proteins. The section on niacin (B-3) was particularly interesting since it involves changing liver functions, and you are encouraged to work with your doctor in this area. I was not familiar with the "niacin flush" but was glad to learn that the newer versions usually avoid that problem. I especially found the discussions of the special issues that women, young people, and seniors have to be helpful.
Get this book today . . . follow its advice . . . and keep it with you!
0Comment| 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
This book deserves many more than five stars! Millions of people will lead longer, healthier, and more productive lives from following the advice here.
In the last 15 years, knowledge about how to reduce heart disease has made major strides. This book is the best source I have seen about what has been learned, and how to apply it to help yourself and those you love. You will probably find it helpful to bring your copy along to see your physician because many primary care physicians will not be up-to-date with the latest findings in some areas, such as the use of supplements.
If you liked Mr. Kowalski's first program for controlling cholesterol, originally published in 1987, you will adore this book. When asking himself what had changed he noted, "Why, practically everything is new!" Mr. Kowalski reviews in detail the strengths and weaknesses of that program, describes the research that has been conducted on cardiovascular health since then, and shows you other risks in addition to cholesterol that must be addressed. He also debunks pseudo-science about cholesterol control.
What impressed me the most is that Mr. Kowalski's old and new programs have worked perfectly for him. Here is a man who had his first heart attack at age 35 and double bypass. He had a second heart attack at 41, followed by a quadruple bypass. In the foreword, cardiac surgeon Dr. Jack Sternlieb describes how the most rigorous tests of Mr. Kowalski's heart and arteries show that it has no blockages as of 1999. Without this program, Mr. Kowalski would probably have needed another bypass operation several years ago. His family record of heart disease is not a good one, and he probably has a genetic tendency to problems in this area. Mr. Kowalski is very physically active now, and has no limitations on his life style due to his cardiac history.
The new program has familiar elements in it, but is considerably less restrictive than the old one. You can eat a lot more foods, and a lot more fat (as long as it is the right kind of fat). The dietary guidelines are quite similar to the new ones brought out by the American Heart Association in 2000.
For most people, the diet features avoiding saturated fat and trans fatty acids, limiting overall fat to hold weight at a healthy level for your height, eating fish at least twice a week (especially fatty fish), lots of fruits and vegetables, whole-grain breads and cereals, consuming soluble fiber, lots of fluids, limiting sugars and empty carbohydrates, and eating slowly. Exercise is 15 miles of walking a week. A variety of supplements are encouraged (especially antioxidents, B vitamins, minerals, polysterols, and pantathine). Don't smoke. Limit alcohol consumption to moderate daily levels, but do not imbibe solely for the cardiovascular benefit. Take one aspirin a day if your stomach can handle it.
I liked the candor in the book quite a lot. For example, "I'm a little embarrassed when I look at the subtitle of the original book, which promises 'no deprivation.'"
In addition to the overall recommendations, each element is described in detail including the scientific studies that support why it works, who should not follow the recommendation, how to work with your doctor for the best results, side effects that can occur, and how these recommendations compare with the various prescription medications now available for lowering cholesterol. He also describes how these recommendations affect other factors for cardiovascular risk such as the amount of low-density lipoprotein (a negative component of overall cholesterol), high-density lipoprotein (a positive component of overall cholesterol), triglycerides, homocysteine, and C-reactive proteins. The section on niacin (B-3) was particularly interesting since it involves changing liver functions, and you are encouraged to work with your doctor in this area. I was not familiar with the "niacin flush" but was glad to learn that the newer versions usually avoid that problem. I especially found the discussions of the special issues that women, young people, and seniors have to be helpful.
Get this book today . . . follow its advice . . . and keep it with you!
0Comment| 64 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 31 May 2009
This book contains a wealth of information about cholesterol in an easy to understand format. It is up to date and gives sensible advice(mostly) about how to deal with high cholesterol. I find myself using it as a reference book as it has different approaches to be used in tandem that give the views of someone who has suffered from and beat the problem, such as diet, exercise and supplements.The author is obviously knowledgeable about the subject and the style is informal and easy to access even though the info is sometimes pretty complex. One thing I didn't like was his advice on diet as it seems far too radical- a very low calorie count is advised for those who need to lose weight and certain food groups are limited . I also thought that many of the recipes were too sweet and geared to American palates. However, overall the book has been useful to me in my struggle with high cholesterol.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 3 April 2009
About 5 years ago I found that I had high cholesterol, I was also carrying 20lbs too much.
My doctor wanted to put me on statins to reduce it. I wasn't one who liked taking drugs, so I did some research and came across this book. Having read it, I suppose you could say I became a convert. I followed the dietary side and increased my exercise and as a result I lost the weight and have remained ever since at the same weight. Within 3 months my cholesterol level had become very healthy and has remained so to this day. Over the past 5 years I have purchased about 25 copies of this book and given them to friends in need as presents and am happy to report there are at least a further 20+ healthy people out there as a result!
0Comment| 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
This book deserves many more than five stars! Millions of people will lead longer, healthier, and more productive lives from following the advice here.
In the last 15 years, knowledge about how to reduce heart disease has made major strides. This book is the best source I have seen about what has been learned, and how to apply it to help yourself and those you love. You will probably find it helpful to bring your copy along to see your physician because many primary care physicians will not be up-to-date with the latest findings in some areas, such as the use of supplements.
If you liked Mr. Kowalski's first program for controlling cholesterol, originally published in 1987, you will adore this book. When asking himself what had changed he noted, "Why, practically everything is new!" Mr. Kowalski reviews in detail the strengths and weaknesses of that program, describes the research that has been conducted on cardiovascular health since then, and shows you other risks in addition to cholesterol that must be addressed. He also debunks pseudo-science about cholesterol control.
What impressed me the most is that Mr. Kowalski's old and new programs have worked perfectly for him. Here is a man who had his first heart attack at age 35 and double bypass. He had a second heart attack at 41, followed by a quadruple bypass. In the foreword, cardiac surgeon Dr. Jack Sternlieb describes how the most rigorous tests of Mr. Kowalski's heart and arteries show that it has no blockages as of 1999. Without this program, Mr. Kowalski would probably have needed another bypass operation several years ago. His family record of heart disease is not a good one, and he probably has a genetic tendency to problems in this area. Mr. Kowalski is very physically active now, and has no limitations on his life style due to his cardiac history.
The new program has familiar elements in it, but is considerably less restrictive than the old one. You can eat a lot more foods, and a lot more fat (as long as it is the right kind of fat). The dietary guidelines are quite similar to the new ones brought out by the American Heart Association in 2000.
For most people, the diet features avoiding saturated fat and trans fatty acids, limiting overall fat to hold weight at a healthy level for your height, eating fish at least twice a week (especially fatty fish), lots of fruits and vegetables, whole-grain breads and cereals, consuming soluble fiber, lots of fluids, limiting sugars and empty carbohydrates, and eating slowly. Exercise is 15 miles of walking a week. A variety of supplements are encouraged (especially antioxidents, B vitamins, minerals, polysterols, and pantathine). Don't smoke. Limit alcohol consumption to moderate daily levels, but do not imbibe solely for the cardiovascular benefit. Take one aspirin a day if your stomach can handle it.
I liked the candor in the book quite a lot. For example, "I'm a little embarrassed when I look at the subtitle of the original book, which promises 'no deprivation.'"
In addition to the overall recommendations, each element is described in detail including the scientific studies that support why it works, who should not follow the recommendation, how to work with your doctor for the best results, side effects that can occur, and how these recommendations compare with the various prescription medications now available for lowering cholesterol. He also describes how these recommendations affect other factors for cardiovascular risk such as the amount of low-density lipoprotein (a negative component of overall cholesterol), high-density lipoprotein (a positive component of overall cholesterol), triglycerides, homocysteine, and C-reactive proteins. The section on niacin (B-3) was particularly interesting since it involves changing liver functions, and you are encouraged to work with your doctor in this area. I was not familiar with the "niacin flush" but was glad to learn that the newer versions usually avoid that problem. I especially found the discussions of the special issues that women, young people, and seniors have to be helpful.
Get this book today . . . follow its advice . . . and keep it with you!
22 Comments| 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 31 May 2009
This is the third copy of this book I have given to colleagues and friends after reading it myself shortly after having bypass surgery six years ago.
Bob Kowalski's personal story is an inspiration and his practical but well-researched tips have certainly helped me lower my cholosterol and adopt a healthier lifestyle. I hope he comes out with a new revision soon as the copyright of 2004 is the only drawback to ensuring that every idea in the book is up to date. I would highly recommend this book to anyone experiencing the effects of high cholesterol.
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on 18 July 2010
This book is sensible and just makes you wake up to the fact that statins are not a cure-all!!
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on 5 May 2011
This book is encouraging, not a doom and gloom manual, written by an author who has considered all the factors that lead to premature death in adults. It gives sensible advice that is easy to follow. Go buy and enjoy a longer life.
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on 18 December 2012
very interesting book good information. i tried the muffins recipe but through them away i think the the recipe gave the wrong measurements for the ingredients /ie a tbsp of baking powder and the grams of the egg substitute .
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on 29 May 2015
Lost my copy and bought another as this book has been instrumental in keep my cholesterol at a normal level. Highly recommended
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