Learn more Download now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Learn more Learn more Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more



on 22 April 2016
Love all books by C.S.Lewis, and another one that does not disappoint. There is depth to the text, but yet it's easy to follow, and makes you think. Surprisingly, in the text, there are moment when you recognize your own thoughts, and pain. The words leap out from the page, and bring a degree of comfort and understanding.
4 people found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 24 September 2016
Someone wrote this book was written in an easy to understand way for the common man. I must be very stupid ! what a struggle. when you grasp his points its interesting , but boy, you have to read so many passages several times over and look up so many words and references. The middle section on 'The fall of Man ' and 'Human pain' were very interesting. i thought i was getting used to the style at this point but then... no. Still not much wiser after reading it.
3 people found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
Deeply philosophical which makes it a hard book to read and grasp, which is a shame because the underlying message is very important and well thought through. Be prepared to persevere with this classic book.
2 people found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 15 June 2011
It is very important to remember when reading this, as with much of Lewis' apologetic work, that this is a layman's view, not a theological treatise. Lewis acknowledges this from the outset and makes reference to it at various points throughout the book. I have to admit, the start of the book was not what I was expecting at all. I thought the whole thing was purely a look at theodicy, though Lewis doesn't really get going on this until the second half of the book, when having spoken a little about 'pain' he then distinguishes between the physical triggering of nerve impulses and the more emotional aspect of anguish or despair, the latter of which is what is then meant when Lewis talks about pain.

Lewis opens with a discourse on the nature of omnipotence. I found it immensely helpful, as Lewis managed to enunciate what had previously been only half-formed thoughts in my own mind and on this section I found myself in near total agreement with him. Interestingly, Lewis doesn't quite pose the problem of pain in the wording commonly found today: "how can a good God allow suffering?" Instead, he states it as "If God were God, He would wish to make His creatures perfectly happy, and if God were almighty He would be able to do what He wished. But the creatures are not happy. Therefore God lacks either goodness, or power, or both."

Lewis' view is to gain an understanding of the terms used in the above statement which is more meaningful than those used in everyday language. So having looked at what it means for God to be described as omnipotent, he then goes on to examine the nature of 'goodness' before he discusses human wickedness and the Fall, with their respective roles in pain.

At all times, Lewis gives a 'tight' argument; that is, it is not easy to summarise and every step in the train of thought must be carefully followed. So I did find myself having to go back and re-read pages on quite a few occasions. I would recommend that each chapter be read in one sitting, as it is difficult to pick up the trail if you stop mid-way, though each chapter is self-contained and gives plenty of food for thought.

Lewis ends the book with a look at hell, pain in animals and heaven. At no point does Lewis give a concise one-liner as the answer to the problem of pain. To do so would be pithy and fail to do justice to the weight of the problem. Rather, the whole book is his answer.

I would be surprised if anyone agreed with Lewis on all of his points, but equally surprised if any christians, at least, were to disagree with him on all points. The book provides plenty to consider and mull over, and it is one I anticipate picking off my shelf many times again to look at.
2 people found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 18 August 2017
What can I say except. What is he talking about. For myself its a real hard read. Very complicated to understand And yes I'm a big reader. There must be another version of this so most of us can understand his complicated writing. No easy read. Sorry.
One person found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 9 May 2017
This book, like a lot of C.S Lewis' works really gets you thinking and encourages you to see things from a different perspective. Book was well packaged and arrived in great condition.
One person found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 9 February 2015
Quite a difficult subject to brooch but CS Lewis does not avoid or attempt to dodge the matter at hand. He recounts many instances which the reader easily recognises and relates to. Still quite a heavy read in places to assume his mastery in one attempt, but well worth the effort.
One person found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 30 August 2013
Some interesting ideas for the Christian to grapple with. Certainly provides some reasoned and intelligent arguments to explain why God invented pain. To sum it up humanity needs it in order to understand sin. Has helped me to give an apologetic on this subject. CS Lewis is way above my intellectual powers and I found some of his ideas hard to follow and a little convoluted, particularly the last couple of chapters. Lewis was clearly very influenced by the "overwhelming" evidence at that time regarding geology, anthropology and biology. This is a great shame but is understandable. It is a shame he did not read The Genesis Flood as the logic and evidence from this work may have radically changed his thinking.
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 5 November 2016
An easy (compared to confusing works by others in his field) but thought provoking read!! Very useful for my philosophy course!
One person found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 17 September 2017
Iam enjoying this book .Making me realise what a blessed and exciting childhood I had.
|0Comment|Report abuse