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on 8 December 2016
This is a love story about Ifemelu and Obinze, star-crossed lovers who traverse time and space (both geographical and cultural) and eventually journey apart. Perhaps not that spectacularly different from the trajectory of countless other love stories, but Adichie's novel stands apart for its bold, full frontal assault on racial issues.

Ifemelu is the titular Americanah, returning to Lagos, Nigeria, after shutting down her blog and a breakup. As she sits in a hair salon, getting her braids done, she reflects on her relationship with Obinze, whom she had left behind in Lagos, and become estranged with after a traumatic episode she suffered while she was a young postgrad in Philadelphia, and the backstory of their young love and her journey to the States ensues. The narrative weaves seamlessly through the past and present, and occasionally focuses on Obinze, though Ifemelu is clearly the main focaliser of the story.

Through Ifemelu's controversial blog on race relations in America, Adichie discusses weighty issues that Ifemelu confronts as a kind of insider-outsider where she is suddenly made aware of her skin colour and difference from African Americans, and the befuddling contradictions that go with asserting her identity. The contents of Ifemelu's blog, which are interspersed throughout most of the novel, is an effective way of broaching these issues without becoming too preachy or derailing the narrative.

Ifemelu is also struck by the attitudes of fellow immigrants from Nigeria. She observes of some online writers and what they would do after visiting their hometowns on hard-earned savings: "Afterwards, they would return to America to fight on the Internet over their mythologies of home, because home was now a blurred place between here and there, and at least online they could ignore the awareness of how inconsequential they had become."

As a novel that details characters' cross-cultural experiences, it is easy to lapse into caricature and generalisations, but Adichie succeeds in presenting a nuanced account which is both moving and thought-provoking.
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on 12 April 2017
Beautifully written, important issues and themes addressed. I especially loved how she presented the experience of being an African in the West and how it was only in the midst of whiteness that Ifemelu became aware of her own blackness. I also like how she presented the internal conflict for those of us who are part of the African diaspora; too African for the West, too Westernized for Africa. It was also nice to see that for once, the girl relentlessly pursues her own success and still gets the guy. My new favourite book!
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on 8 May 2017
I have never in my life felt so much a part of another person's reality, got such a clear and truthful insight into a culture so different from my own nor felt so immersed in the world of a character. I got that sad feeling when I turned a page just now and realised it was the last - that is proof of a brilliant writer. I can't wait to read your next novel Chimamanda!
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on 6 March 2017
I loved everything about this book - the characters, the story but most of all, the vivid descriptions. I couldn't recommend this any higher.
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on 12 April 2017
Such a great piece of literature
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on 8 July 2017
Regarding the seller, the parcel arrived on time and looked intact. The book was in a great condition and did not present crinkles.

Concerning the content of the book itself, I could be a little biased as this is one of my favourite novels ever. A major part of the story concerns the still very debated issue of race in the USA. As a while European, I found many passages extremely eye-opening without trivialising the matter. Nonetheless, this is also a book about love. Love for a (fantastic and enviable) man, love for books, love for ourselves.

Thanks Chimamanda for this masterpiece!
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on 8 May 2017
I enjoyed this book. It was a long read however, but I like the writers style and the early part of the book still set in Nigeria. The thing about writing is you always wish for the ending to be different but as always I appreciate the art. All in all a good read.
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on 19 April 2017
Ngozi constantly challenges you to look through the eyes of others, and she helps us do that with her lively writing. Ifemelu is real and we admire her honesty and she is able to spot and strip the affectations of others, including ourselves. I paid the additional price for the audio and the accents being it to life. Fantastic book, I highly recommend it.
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on 10 May 2017
Excellent read just like her other books are tho I wish Amazon wouldn't insist on more words words words words
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on 21 March 2014
The end of this book came as a shock. As in, I turned the page and it was over. I liked how it ended- I was expecting to be slapped in the face as payment for my devotion, but I wasn't and I'm grateful for it.

My title 'everything' is both praise and criticism. There was so much in this book that there was ample to love and leftovers to dislike and even feel indifferent about.

Chimamanda has such an easy way with words. A way of looking behind eyes and behind actions to draw out the real meaning behind people's lives and personalities. But for me, in this book, it became a problem because a lot of time it took me out of the story - wondering if it was Ifemelu or Obinze talking or Chimamanda giving her opinions. That was the only problem I had with it.

Apart from that, the book was such a joy to spend time with and it left me wishing I had her way with words.

Here's to her next one.
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