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4.4 out of 5 stars
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4.4 out of 5 stars
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VINE VOICEon 30 January 2016
This is a tremendously important book in exposing and debunking much of the pseudo-science that bedevils much public discourse in this country. He focuses on a whole range of issues, including homeopathy, faddish nutritionists and health scares such as the MRSA and anti-MMR hoaxes. These cases have a number of factors in common, including the media's misunderstanding of basic research techniques and their misinterpretation of evidence and statistics, and the desire for medical stories to fit common templates such as "killer disease", "miracle cure" or "brave maverick doctor defies medical establishment", which leads to over or under-reporting of research depending on its findings and origin. These faults are, of course, not unique to the media, but the media's role as the bridge between science and the great majority of the public puts them in a unique position to influence public perceptions (as in other issues). The book is not perfect, there is a fair amount of repetition (though he covers very important points that are worth hammering home) and I found the author's tone occasionally a little patronising. However, its central messages are crucial to a healthy public debate about the opportunities and limitations of scientific research, not only within the medical sphere.
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 8 November 2015
Although it's been around for many years now, and Ben Goldacre's high profile makes much of the content feel familiar even to new readers, Bad Science is still well worth a read - not only for his extremely entertaining style but also the very practical details about how to understand science (mis)reporting in the media. The main targets of Goldacre's well-directed ire will be be already familiar if you have read some of his work elsewhere, but these details means it is still a very useful, as well as fun, read.
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on 12 June 2017
Excellent book, recommended to heath conscious individuals. Opens your eyes about the "Pharmaceutical Lobby" business.
Gives useful advice about harmful medicines. Highly recommended.
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on 12 October 2015
A very stimulating book. I had just finished an online Edx course "Think101x The Science of Everyday Thinking" which taught critical thinking, before this purchase, and this really meshed with Ben Goldacre's book. It was interesting to see a number of the concepts e.g. Regression to the Mean coming alive. I shall definitely be spending time on his web site and following up some of his references.
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on 14 September 2011
I think we all wonder why we struggle with the 'scientific' advice we read in the newspapers. Eat this, don't eat that, breathing too much will kill you, etc. And then the was all that fuss over the Millenium Bug, and MMR, and .... you get the idea.

This book sets out to tell us why there's all this confusion, and busts a few myths along the way. You don't have to be a scientist to read it, though some rudimentary knowledge is helpful. Its a very easy read and in the end you actually feel you can read an item on science or technology in the news paper and ask some intelligent questions about what the article is actually telling you. And you will definately be able to silence the pub bore when he tells you about the latest miracle drug or scientific wonder. Highly recomended.
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on 3 July 2017
Good comment on invalid use of statistics and some of the major culprits. I would have liked more material on use of statistics in scientific research generally and less focus on particular hobby-horses.
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on 14 June 2017
Sometimes interesting, sometimes not.. nothing spectacular..
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on 14 January 2014
Everybody, especially medics and NHS managers, should be made to read this book. It gets to the heart of what looks like malpractice on the part of the major drug manufacturers. For the layman it could improve ones dialogue when discussing medication with ones GP. Perhaps it should be on the school curriculum.
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on 6 June 2017
Essential reading for anyone that's ever been reeled in by bad science myths or pop-science bullsh1t 😊 Makes you ask questions and look at the facts...
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on 3 November 2014
excellent book - should be compulsory reading for all sixth form students, to help them leave school with at least an appreciation of analytical, logical techniques
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