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I enjoy watching Philip Mould on TV trying to authenticate paintings. That was the reason I bought this book. Whilst it is interesting reading about lost and recovered art and how masterpieces have been found in county house sales, I regret Philips writing is no where as stimulating as his narration on TV.

An 'ok' read but wish it was more readable.
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on 27 June 2017
Buyer beware! This isn't as much a book about lost art treasures as it is about Mr Mould kvetching that he missed out on buying a Rembrandt for £20. Go for something else if you're not someone who finds Antiques Roadshow intellectual entertainment......
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on 26 May 2017
excellent
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on 31 August 2016
Great item, fab service, thank you 😊
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on 22 March 2011
This interesting book is written essentially for the ordinary reader; anecdotal and without condescension to those readers unversed in the esoteric nature of art dealing. As in his choice of title the author broadly equates his experiences as an art dealer with that of running a Christopher Marlow like detective agency, frequently following often barely tangible clues to potentially valuable art works; this sometimes involves strange and exciting encounters with peculiar, eccentric collectors and fellow dealers before achieving ultimate success. Although now an established expert in his specialised field there is nothing precious about Philip Mould's writing, making it accessible to anyone interested in a good narrative simply for itself.
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on 16 August 2011
This is, by far, the most intriguing and articulate non-fiction book I have read for a very long time. It gives you one of those rare opportunities to sit back and delve into a subject of cultural relevance, told from personal experience by someone who really knows his field. Switch off your phone, sit down with some tea or wine, and enjoy this gem of a book!

NB: This is the paperback version of "The Art Detective: Fakes, Frauds and Finds and the Search for Lost Treasures".
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on 26 June 2009
I Really enjoyed this book. Written in a very readable style which conveys the pictures & personalities within the art world. The format is very narrative which makes it read almost like a novel (but unlike a novel its amazingly true). I found myself gazing in on a world I never knew existed and whilst you are learning about the high end of the art market with big money players you can't help feeling that Philip Mould is also teaching us 'the ordinary man in the street' something about art in general; its appreciation, value and meaning. I'm sure there have been many books written on art but not all of them strive to provide you with a litle of the art sleuth's special insight. A geat book - highly recommended.
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on 23 September 2013
Some intriguing stories of art detection here, not least the identification of Gainsborough's youthful version of his fine landscape known as Cornard Wood. Philip Mould also describes his discovery of Gainsborough's viewpoint in the wood itself. This might be wishful thinking. The picture incorporates a distant view of a church known to the painter but Gainsborough's wood was really a reworking of a composition by Ruisdael. I don't think the author mentions that, but I found his book very absorbing; quite hard to put down.
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on 10 July 2009
Having seen Mr Mould on TV and liking his presentation style, I was interested in reading his book. However, I was a little disappointed.

The title was a little excessive as there were only a few "cases" mentioned - How the sale of Damien Hurst articles can qualify as lost art is beyond me.

My main criticisms are the poor spelling - spell checkers don't check the context of words. Missing words - these tended to interrupt the flow and by the end of the book it became similar to the Chinese water torture - I was waiting for the next interruption. These problems seem unrepresentative of Mr. Mould's exacting standards.

Apart from these niggles, I found the stories fascinating and would have like more of the same and with a little more detail of the technical side of the subject. I would recommend this to my friends, mentioning, of course, the problems.
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on 30 November 2013
I really enjoyed reading this book. The author uses a few fascinating stories from his long career as an art dealer, to explain how great paintings resurface. He goes through the detective work necessary to uncover "lost" works of art, thereby turning a humble painting worth maybe a few thousand, into a masterpiece that can fetch millions. If you have any interest in the art world, it is worth reading this book. I highly recommend it.
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