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4.4 out of 5 stars
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4.4 out of 5 stars
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on 6 January 2014
I first read this Christie book a couple of years ago and although I enjoyed it, I didn't consider it as being up there with her best. Well after recently seeing the ITV adaptation starring the marvellous David Suchet I've just finished reading it again and have no problem greatly revising my initial opinion of the book. Now although there are actually a large number of changes made to Christie's story in the television production, some quite major, it is good viewing and re-kindled my interest in the story.

Back to the book now... In this mystery, Poirot is looking back at a crime from the past. He is employed by a young woman to look into the circumstances of the conviction of her mother for the poisoning of her artist father 16 years previously. The five pigs of the title are the five principals present at the time of the crime (two men and three women). Poirot privately assigns each of them a line from the "This little piggy" nursery rhyme and his work in solving the crime comes from the telling of the event from the POV of each of the five. Christie's writing is really clever and both she and Poirot are at the top of their game as they mesh the five versions of the same story together. At no time did anything feel repetitive as each of character's take on events took centre stage. You know of course that Poirot gets to the truth so your job is to marvel at how he actually pieces it together. Funnily enough for reasons I can't explain when I first read this book I didn't, as I usually do, try to work out which of the suspects was the guilty party I simply "observed" from over Poirot's shoulder so to speak.

It is a clever and worthy addition in the Christie catalogue and one I'm really glad that I revisited. PS it is worth giving the ITV adaptation a look too!

A 5* read.
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Carla - daughter of Caroline Crale who was convicted of murdering her husband sixteen years ago - wants Hercule Poirot to find out who was really responsible. She believes her mother was innocent. Poirot is rather reluctant to take on the case but something about the girl persuades him to do so. He sets out to interview the five people who were in the house at the time of the death and asks them to write their own accounts of that day.

The reader's job - along with Poirot - is to work out who is telling the truth. Is there another possible murderer and has there been a miscarriage of justice? As ever this book is well written and superbly plotted and the characters spring to life on the page when you're reading their accounts of what happened.

It kept me turning the pages and I read it in less than twenty four hours. I never used to be fan of Poirot as I preferred Miss Marple but I'm starting to like his way of working and the sort of person he is. There is no one quite like him in detective fiction.
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on 27 January 2014
My favourite Poirot, bar Curtain, this is a very different book to the usual murder mysteries she writes. Poirot is hired to deduce the innocence (or not) of the long dead Caroline Crale, convicted of the murder of her artist husband Amyas Crale. There are five suspects and each of their memories (or what they claim are their memories) of the crime are painstakingly taken apart by the great detective. Five viewpoints of the crime but which is the true remembrance? Wonderful.
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on 13 June 2013
This is not one of my favourite Christie's as I find there is too much discourse and not enough action. This is a story that goes back into the past by 16 years to a case where a woman is convicted of killing her husband and her now grown up daughter wants Poirot to investigate the crime as she believes her mother may be innocent and wants to prove that there is no family history of madness before she married her fiance.

Five people were staying at the house at the time of the crime and Poirot tracks them down and asks for their versions of what happened. Can Poirot discover who's guilty by reading a five a counts of what happened.

Well written, but simply not one of my favourites.
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on 14 October 2015
Very well written, and brilliant plotting -- caught out again, alas. Also much amused by the old maid who trots out a load of trite psychological cliche only for her 'agony aunt' style prognostications to be earnestly highlighted by other readers! Nice one, Agatha.
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VINE VOICEon 26 January 2014
This is only the second Christie novel I have read, and it doesn't have the immediate impact of The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, but it is a pretty good example of the clear, simple prose and laying of clues for which she is famous and is a great page turner. The resemblance of the five suspects in the murder of Amyas Crale to the five little pigs of the nursery rhyme is fairly tenuous.
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on 7 March 2016
My first and last foray with this author. A national treasure but, for me, I found this book incredibly dated in prose and structure. Character development was lacking, and I really just wanted to get the book over with. The big reveal was clever, and did at least show why Christie is so revered.
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on 13 December 2013
Hercule Poirot is one of my favourite detectives,and his creator a wonderful authoress. This story Five Little Pigs, is a terrific whodunit, and is highly recommended. Just reading a Hercule novel, the voice of David Suchet, as M. Poirot seems to come into being! Can't be helped, that is how good he was at his art.
All I can say is read and enjoy.
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on 1 April 2017
Very good novel. Makes me want to read more Agatha Christie. Enjoyed all of the twists and turns involved in the book.
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on 29 December 2016
Everything about this CD gripping. The equivalent of unputdownable. Satisfying.
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