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4.6 out of 5 stars
73
4.6 out of 5 stars


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on 3 October 2007
Carlos Acosta's memoir is as vibrant and dazzling as his dancing. Telling the story of his incredible journey from breakdancing urchin on the streets of Havana to prince at the Royal Opera House, this is much more than a book about ballet, it is the lyrical and moving tale of a boy's gift, his father's ambition, and the price he pays for fame. With sensual descriptions that evoke the scents and rhythms of Havana, at times, the book feels more like a magical realist novel than an autobiography. Sometimes funny, sometimes heartbreaking, always charming - a totally engrossing read.
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on 25 May 2017
Very small print. This would be best read on a Kindle if your sight is not tot good.
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on 29 June 2017
a great rags to riches story with a tender heart - I enjoyed it
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on 16 April 2017
Fantastic read and very entertaining book.
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on 25 April 2017
Seen him dance and seen the way of life in Cuba makes this a fascinating read. The hurdles Carlos overcame were phenomenal.
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on 1 April 2017
Very happy with purchase. I have no hesitation purchasing in the future. My friend and myself are delighted.
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on 6 June 2009
This is a fascinating story of Acosta's journey to ballet stardom, from his early days as a breakdancing ruffian in Cuba. This is what lies behind those tremendous balletic leaps ... the injuries, the pain, the years of sweat, the struggles with his father, the loneliness of a young man far from family and home. Acosta comes across as tremendously likeable - and you hope,when the dancing career is over, he will find personal happiness and a way home, at last.
Considering he isn't a professional writer, this is far better written than many autobiographies - though his editor should have been tougher on repetitiveness, especially towards the end.
But it's a compelling human story, even for readers who aren't particularly interested in dance.
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on 22 August 2011
I found this book to be unusually honest. I've read many autobiographies, but Carlos's personal story really touched me.
It seems incredible that a boy from such a humble background, and with no particular inclination to dance, apart from Street Dancing, has come so far. His love for his family shines through. I loved the photos - they really added to the intimate feel of the book.
Carlos is STILL an amazing dancer (despite what someone has written here). He even managed to project his personality in the hell that is the vast O2 stadium! That personality comes across in the writing (though obviously he had to have an English translation) You can still hear his 'voice'.

Highly Recommended for ballet lovers and non-ballet lovers, as a great story of our times.
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on 22 October 2007
This is a very inspiring story for anyone, whether you are a ballet fan or not, from his childhood stories set in Havana to his loneliness & struggles later in life, it is interesting & endearing, I could not put the book down, it is written very well, and I would certainly recommend this book.
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VINE VOICEon 31 December 2008
Interesting, page turning and amusing. I knew little of Acosta before I read this book and I'm not sure that I know that much about him now, except that he's straight, very very straight - who knew that a dancers greatest concern is not becoming too aroused with their partners?! (He's very keen to reassure readers that he likes women, not men, no homosexuality here thank you very much! Which is part of the fun of the book.) Acosta comes across as a likeable scamp whose modesty is, I suspect, a relatively new addition to his personality. As with many autobiographies what is left out is often as revealing as what's included. He's led an extremely interesting life, a cuban ballet dancer from a tough background who wanted nothing more than to be a footballer... to tell you more would be to ruin the fun and you don't need to be a ballet enthusiast or an Acosta enthusiast to enjoy this, I certainly wasn't when I read it, but I will be looking him up on a stage near me soon.
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