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on 26 July 2015
Nothing wrong with the book, but not quite what I wanted. I wish I could find a sort of family tree of all these monarchs so I could see who was descended from whom, their dates of birth and death, and the dates they reigned. Any suggestions?
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on 26 January 2007
David Starkey provides a gripping tale of the various claims to the English and later British throne that there has been throughout the century. What Starkey achieves so well in this book that he does not merely catalogue every King and Queen from King Henry VII to Queen Victoria but rather how the power of the monarchy passed to each Dynasty in turn. A great read and one which is highly recommended for anyone reading about the English monarchy for the first time.
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on 28 June 2017
OK
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on 13 March 2017
A hard read but worth it
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on 18 May 2017
A great book thank - you
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on 7 June 2017
brilliant book and very readable. I wish we could have had something like this when I was at school
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on 27 April 2017
Great value. As new condition, very happy
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on 19 January 2007
I can seldom remember enjoying a history book more - it is a wonderful sweep through the tudors to the present day, and would heartily recommend it for anyone interested in history but without an academic background- it reads so well.

My only concern is that David Starkey wrote a wonderful introduction to the origins of the monarchy (literally the book of series 1 of monarchy)but has jumped several hundered years, how I would have liked him to introduce me to the early mediaeval period. I also wonder where the promised Henry VIII biogrpahy has gone - it was listed for publishing later this year but is no longer listed - that was going to be the highlight of my year!
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on 9 January 2011
`Monarchy: From the Middle Ages to Modernity' is one of the best non-fictional history books which I have had the pleasure to read. The book's brilliance for me lies in its simplicity, as this is a book which describes the transition of power from one monarch to the next and does not become overly biographical by concentrating too heavily on the life of a single monarch. The book lists each monarch (or Lord Protector!) from King Henry VII to Queen Victoria and concludes with a very brief look at the `ultra-modern' House of Windsor.

This is a book about the transfer of ultimate power within the English, Scottish and British political establishments. It explains how ultimate power was at one point wielded by the reigning monarch and also describes the ways in which this power was eventually leached away and handed to Parliament and then the Prime Minister over the centuries. This is the history of our Government and most importantly our nation explained in a way which is certainly informative, but completely compelling.

This is an excellent way to become acquainted with some of our lesser well known monarchs as the author incorporates fascinating details and facts which breathe life into these long dead heads of state. Starkey definitely leaves the reader wanting more as he gives you just enough details to satisfy curiosity, but not enough to answer all those inevitable additional questions which arise. That's a very clever writing technique as it means that I will have to buy more of his books (or other equivalents) in order to slake my appetite for further knowledge. My previous comment is not intended to criticise the book's content as I am under the impression that the book is intended to give a general overview of each monarch and is not expected to evaluate or scrutinise each one in depth.

A brief warning to any potential Kindle reader however; the current Kindle edition does not contain any of the portraits as listed at the beginning of the book, which is a shame. The Kindle edition does contain Royal genealogies/family trees at the beginning, but the text is so small (even when adjusted to the maximum setting) that it is extremely difficult to read the names and dates. You may wish to bear this in mind when considering whether or not to purchase the paperback edition.

This book is highly recommended to all Royal enthusiasts. It's written with typical `Starkey' flair and reads almost as if he was in the room with you! Thoroughly enjoyable.
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on 16 February 2007
David Starky's Monarchy - from the middle ages to modernity, is just what it says on the 'tin'... This book explains in sometimes mind boggling detail the true politics and practices that put our monarchs on the throne... someone always had an ulterior motive...(usually power or money or religion) nothing new there!! for those of you that thought that our Royals always inherited the throne by birthright think again!!. This book also has lots of detail about the life and times of England... very interesting and well worth reading.
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